Philosophy Today

Founded in 1957, Philosophy Today is a quarterly magazine published by DePaul University. The magazine has a circulation of over 1,000 readers and specializes in information on contemporary philosophy and philosophers. The Editor of the magazine is David W. Pellauer.

Articles from Vol. 40, No. 3, Fall

Adieu
For a long time, for a very long time, I've feared having to say adieu to Emmanuel Levinas. I knew that my voice would tremble at the moment of saying it, and especially saying it aloud, right here, before him, so close to him, pronouncing this word...
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Adorno and Heidegger on Art in the Modern World
Many readers have noticed that the works of Adorno and Heidegger bear many striking similarities, especially with respect to the question of art and its place in the modern world. In this essay, I shall discuss some of these similarities, and then turn...
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Bergson: The Philosophy of Duree-Difference
It is nothing new to remark on the puzzling nature of the term "postmodernism." For all its prefix's portentous celebration of finality, postmodernism is a thoroughly modern phenomenon. As a firm fixture of present-day thinking, a particularly obstinate...
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Between Emergence and Possibility: Foucault, Derrida, and Judith Butler on Performative Identity
FOUCAULT, DERRIDA, AND JUDITH BUTLER ON PERFORMATIVE IDENTITY It would seem that the book is closed on the relation between Jacques Derrida's work and Michel Foucault's. I As Derrida writes in a recent essay on Foucault, the sometimes acrimonious debate...
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Infinity and the Relation: The Emergence of a Notion of Infinity in Derrida's Reading of Husserl
In "The Double Session," Jacques Derrida, commenting on Jean-Pierre Richard's use as examples of the themes the "blank" and the "fold" in the work of Mallarme to demonstrate the ideally exhaustive and totalizing possibilities of thematic criticism,1insists...
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In Memoriam Emmanuel Levinas
The previous night, I had listened to the midnight mass celebrated in Bethlehem in the presence of Yasir Arafat-a ceremony that may have touched some Christians and Muslims. And then, a few hours later, the news of the death of the Jewish philosopher...
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Liberalism and Moral Selfhood
Historically, liberal theories of justice have presupposed certain metaphysical assumptions concerning the self that increasingly and rightly are falling into disfavor in many contemporary philosophical circles. The human subject has traditionally been...
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Openings: Derrida, Differance, and the Production of Justice
"If you let differance have its way in ethics, you would never stop writing, because you would have to write down the names of everyone, one by one, and say what is happening to them."1 So says John Caputo who, apparently at least, has parted with Heidegger...
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Power and the Constitution of Sartre's Identity
1. Mask Behind a Mask. . . Nietzsche's power extends itself into all sorts of curious places in philosophy, and this seems to be the case more in France than anywhere else. It is not necessary to recount the conscious and unconscious transvaluations...
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The Fedorovian Roots of Stalinism
Nikolai Fedorov (d. 1903) was one of the more eccentric of Russian philosophers. He spent his life as a humble librarian in the major Moscow library. His philosophical writings, published posthumously as the Philosophy of the Common Deed (Filosofiia...
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