Philosophy Today

Founded in 1957, Philosophy Today is a quarterly magazine published by DePaul University. The magazine has a circulation of over 1,000 readers and specializes in information on contemporary philosophy and philosophers. The Editor of the magazine is David W. Pellauer.

Articles from Vol. 41, No. 1, Spring

After Aesthetics: Heidegger and Benjamin on Art and Experience
For, in truth, the fact whether and how an era is committed to an aesthetics, whether and how it adopts a stance toward art of an aesthetic character, is decisive for the way art shapes the history of that era-or remains irrelevant for it. Heidegger,...
Bread and Wine
In entitling the following text, offered to memorialize my very dear friend Andre Schuwer, "Bread and Wine" is to be sounded and, I hope, heard in a broad range of registers. Though it is precisely the measure of this range that is at issue in the text,...
Can a Woman Harass a Man?: Toward a Cultural Understanding of Bodies and Power
I begin this essay with two current renditions of sexual harassment, one fictional and the other semi-fictional.' Let me say from the outset that I believe neither of them to be very helpful to an understanding of sexual harassment. Rather, they illustrate...
Critical Theory between Modernity and Postmodernity
Critical theory, as conceived by Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer, distinguishes itself from "traditional" theory by claiming to be a theory with "practical intent." In this regard, it finds its inspiration in Marx's famous Eleventh Thesis: "The philosophers...
Decision, Deliberation, and Democratic Ethos
According with the trend in democratic theory currently in vogue, in order to defend democracy it is necessary to give it rational foundations. Indeed, many theorists following this approach believe that it is by providing such foundations that allegiance...
Deleuze and the Prepersonal
The dissolution of the subject has been one of the staples of continental philosophy for the last half century or so. This dissolution has been asserted, denied, championed, and bemoaned by various thinkers across the philosophic, literary, and political...
Derrida's Watch / Foucault's Pendulum
Derrida's weaving of irony and openness in his claims for discipleship bears further thought. Since I find our voices passing and repassing in the experiments I have made with certain of the passages of an early essay of his, and of certain others, I...
Editors' Introduction
These papers from the SPEP Seattle '94 and Chicago '95 meetings explore the ways in which the Western continental traditions are open to and create openings for the other. Arranged under the headings of Matters of Love and Justice, The Existential and...
Egyptian Priests and German Professors: On the Alleged Difficulty of Philosophy
We all know philosophy is difficult. Conceptually, physically, emotionally, politically, financially difficult. Heidegger found it easy to talk about this difficulty, and it appears as a major theme of the hermeneutics of factical life. The predecessor...
Empathy before and after Husserl
Husserl's definitive treatment of intersubjectivity and the consciousness of other people is contained in the Cartesian Meditations, say commentators. On the transcendental ego and its constitution of objects in consciousness, consult the first and especially...
Fairy Tales for Politics: The Other, Once More
Derrida has characterized his thought as an attempt to think a relationship to otherness such that the other is neither incorporated nor expelled, yet the relationship between thinking alterity and responding to present others remains ambiguous.' His...
Foucauldian Mutations of Language
In his early works, Foucault describes two mutations-radical shifts-in the functioning of language. The first is the shift from language as representation (Classical) to language as subjectcentered (Modern). The second shift is from modern language to...
Foucault's Attack on Sex-Desire
At the end of The History of Sexuality, volume 1, Michel Foucault writes, "The rallying point for the counterattack against the deployment of sexuality ought not to be sex-desire, but bodies and pleasures."1 This assertion has two parts-a rejection of...
Foucault's Reconfiguration of the Subject: From Nietzsche to Butler, Laclau/Mouffe, and Beyond
The breakdown of philosophical subjectivity and its dispersion in a language that dispossesses it while multiplying it within the space created by its absence is probably one of the fundamental structures of contemporary thought. Michel Foucault, "A...
Fractured Passion in Kierkegaard's Either/Or
The authorship of Soren Kierkegaard has long been thought to be one unified by a religious purpose that connects the many diverse perspectives present in his corpus-and with good reason, since Kierkegaard himself explicitly made this claim about his...
Liberating Experience from the Vice of Structuralism: The Methods of Merleau-Ponty and Nagarjuna
The characteristics which have been assigned to the "real being" of things are the characteristics of non-being, of nothingness-the "real world" has been constructed out of the contradiction to the actual world: an apparent world indeed, in so far as...
Much Obliged
I would like to do a number of things here: trace the account of responsibility that Jacques Derrida is developing back to Nietzsche's account of breeding animals with the right to make promises, back to Husserl's sense of an ability to give intuitive...
Neighbors in Death
Werner Marx's teaching career spanned two continents and two cultures; his German-Jewish experience spanned the divide between two irreconcilable historical worlds; and his academic mission combined the roles of thinker and witness.1 It is not surprising,...
Nietzsche and the Value of Truth
In the remarks that follow, I present and defend an argument, taken from Nietzsche's later writings, against granting a privileged value to truth and to truthfulness. In short, this argument identifies an unconditional value of truth and demonstrates...
Opening the Future: The Paradox of Promising in the Hobbesian Social Contract
To breed an animal with the right to make promises-is not this the paradoxical task that nature has set itself in the case of man? Nietzsche When at the beginning of modernity philosophers were seeking an alternative account of political authority to...
Philosophy and Racial Identity
In the 1993 film, "Map of the Human Heart," an Inuit man asks a white engineer who has come to northern Canada to map the region, "Why are you making maps?" Without hesitating, the white man responds "They will be very accurate." Map-making and race-making...
Stigmata: Job the Dog
At present when I return to the age of the Clos Salembier, to which I have not come back for forty years and I will never come back, where conserved in the blue amber air of the immemorial past, the house awaits me in the garden where still each year...
The Eclipse of Gender: Simone De Beauvoir and the Differance of Translation
In a critical passage of the introduction to his The Birth of a Clinic, Michel Foucault suggests that we belong to "an age of criticism whose lack of a primary philosophy" keeps us "at a distance from an original language" (Foucault 1973, xv) and dooms...
Two Paradoxes in Heidegger
Martin Heidegger committed two magisterial blunders in the full span of his philosophical work. They join the ends of his career and illuminate the connection between his philosophy and his politics but are of unequal weight and promise. They are closely...
Whole Earth Measurements: How Many Phenomenologists Does It Take to Detect a "Greenhouse Effect"
Let us take a very commonplace, often discussed and critical topic within our conversations regarding critical environmental issues: Are we detecting a "Greenhouse Effect," and related to this, is it exacerbated by "homogenic factors," i.e., human actions?...