Philosophy Today

Founded in 1957, Philosophy Today is a quarterly magazine published by DePaul University. The magazine has a circulation of over 1,000 readers and specializes in information on contemporary philosophy and philosophers. The Editor of the magazine is David W. Pellauer.

Articles from Vol. 47, 2003

Arguing over Participatory Parity: On Nancy Fraser's Conception of Social Justice
Over the last decade, Nancy Fraser has been developing a comprehensive and incisive critical social theory, one that, to use Marx's phrase, can further the "the work of our time to clarify to itself (critical philosophy) the meaning of its own struggles...
Between Termini: Heidegger, Cassirer, and the Two Terms of Transcendental Method
The debate between Heidegger and Cassirer at Davos, though relatively short, turns out to be wide-ranging one. As the debate progresses it seems less and less clear that there is a common language between the two disputants, making it hard to identify...
Editors' Introduction
The twenty-two essays that make up this volume were selected from nearly one hundred papers delivered at the forty-second annual meeting of the Society for Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy (SPEP). Those delivered at the meeting were, in turn,...
Foucault's Political Spirituality
Recently, while rereading some material in The Essential Works of Foucault, I came upon a passage that pulled me up short and then sent me flying from my English translation to the French original. The passage, from an interview in May, 1978, contains...
Gadamer and the Living Virtuality of Speech
In part three of Truth and Method, HansGeorg Gadamer seeks to counter the reductive treatment of language that he takes to have originated in Plato's Cratylus by insisting on what he calls elsewhere the "ontological valence of the word" (Seinsvalenz...
Hegel's Antigone and the Dialectics of Sexual Difference
Hegel has been widely criticized for his conservative conception of the fixed social positions assigned to men and women. This critique concerns first of all the section of the Phenomenology of Spirit where he discusses, with reference to Sophocles'...
Hegel's Dialectic and the Recognition of Feminine Difference
Many recent feminist interpreters of Hegel have criticized his conception of dialectic as implicitly masculinist. Allegedly, Hegel figures dialectic as a process whereby a unitary, implicitly masculine, term incorporates a feminine other that has been...
Hermeneutics and Philosophy of History: Ricoeur at Ninety
I shall organize my presentation in terms of three assertions that relate to the topic of hermeneutics and the philosophy of history in the work of Paul Ricoeur. The first of these assertions is that the philosophy of history has been an almost constant...
Husserl's Conception of Reason as Authenticity
Both of Husserl's last two major publications from the 30's refer to a crisis-a crisis in Europe, a crisis in and regarding science, and a crisis concerning the nature and possibilities of philosophy.1 They are of course for him symptoms of the same...
Merleau-Ponty in Dialogue with the Cognitive Sciences in Light of Recent Imitation Research
Recent revival of interest in pursuing a constructive dialogue between phenomenologists and cognitive scientists testifies, if need be, that the methodologies based on first person approaches, i.e., rigorous and trained reflection on experience, and...
"My Body, This Paper, This Fire": The Fate of Emotion in Foucault's Kantian Legacy
In a lecture from 1978, Foucault suggested that modern reflection on the art of government arose out of a spirit of resistance to practices of early state formation in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries: not that critics refused government altogether,...
"Poetry and People" in Heidegger's Germanien Lectures
Heidegger's 1933 Rektoratsrede, "The Self-Assertion of the German University,"1 is very much an exhortation in the first person plural. By addressing the German academic community, of which he himself is a part, Heidegger is, at least indirectly, addressing...
Specters of the Humean Self
The significance of Hume's skeptical arguments for the development of Kant's critical philosophy is well-known to those familiar with the history of philosophy. In fact, it would not be imprecise to say that the whole of Kant's philosophy may be viewed...
Spielbedeutungen: Husserl on Rule-Following and the Mechanization of Thought
Wittgenstein is often thought to be the father of the view that the meaning of a word is its use in a language.1 More specifically, as the doctrine goes, the meaning of a word is its use in accordance to a fixed rule. Therefore, in order to examine the...
The Aesthetic and the Poetic Image: Beyond the Ekphrasic Divide with Rilke and Cézanne
An object of many scholars' fascination, and my own here, is that of a poet's fascination with paintings, and in particular, Rainer Marie Rilke's fascination with Paul Cézanne. Rilke wrote extensively about Cézanne in a series of letters to Clara Rilke...
The Completeness of Foucault's Table of the Classical Episteme
Now . . . where was I?1Toward the end of his life, Kant kept a memorandum book to compensate for his failing memory. One entry, dated February 1802, refers to his recently dismissed manservant, Martin Lampe, who had apparently treated Kant in a disrespectful...
The Difference an Instant Makes: Bachelard's Brilliant Breakthrough
Le temps ne coule pas. Il jaillit.Gaston Bachelard, L'intuition de l'instant, p.106One can read much, perhaps all, of the philosophy of the last two centuries-from Kant and Hegel to Bergson and James, from Husserl and Heidegger to Derrida and Deleuze-as...
The Other Speaking in My Voice: On the Suppression of Dialogue in Otherwise Than Being
I argue that the heteronomous reception of the order "from" the Other cannot be understood as listening to this Other. Next, I argue that saying fails in significant respects to truly speak to this Other.Illeity and the Command "of" the OtherIf my saying...
The Redemptive Instant: Bachelard on the Epistemological and Existential Value of Surprise
The notion of redemption was first used by Bachelard when developing his conception of time and consciousness in L'Intuition de l'instant (1932), as he engaged in a polemic with Bergson.1 He used it again two years later in "Idéalisme discursif" when...
The Strangeness of the Racialized Subject: Confronting Kristeva's Foreigner
In Strangers to Ourselves, Julia Kristeva casts the foreigner, whom we tend to place on the outside, as the foreigner within: "Strangely the foreigner is living within us: he is the hidden face of our identity, the space that wrecks our abode, the time...
Thinking through Singularity and Universality in Levinas
We are accustomed to read Levinas's philosophy as an ethical critique of phenomenology or ontology, but his work is relatively infrequently discussed in relation to the canon of moral philosophy. This is no doubt largely due to the fact that important...
Violence and the Denigration of Community: Between Transcendental and Revolutionary Violence in Fanon
Is it justified to claim that violence is one of the most fundamental and ubiquitous themes in contemporary Continental philosophy? Or that it is the exploration, diagnosis, and critique of violence in all of its guises that motivates so much of recent...
We Have Never Been Human or, How We Lost Our Humanity: Derrida and Habermas on Cloning
If the question of the relation of nature and history is to be seriously posed, then it only offers any chance of solution if it is possible to comprehend historical being in its most extreme historical determinancy, where it is most historical, as natural...