Philosophy Today

Founded in 1957, Philosophy Today is a quarterly magazine published by DePaul University. The magazine has a circulation of over 1,000 readers and specializes in information on contemporary philosophy and philosophers. The Editor of the magazine is David W. Pellauer.

Articles from Vol. 42, 1998

An Appeal to Reopen the Question of Influence
Since my paper is focused rather narrowly on a single issue, I would like to preface it with some personal remarks in appreciation of Hazel Barnes and her contribution to philosophy. We are perhaps most indebted to Hazel Barnes for first bringing existentialism...
A Singular Justice: Ethics and Politics between Levinas and Derrida
The problem of the relation between ethics and politics in the philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas is, above all, the problem of a singular justice: can there be an abstract principle or law that does justice to the absolute singularity of the other who faces...
Counter-Remembering the Enlightenment
Our relation to the Enlightenment can be put in terms of rejection or acceptance. A feminist might reject the Enlightenment and its universalizing assumptions on the grounds that they inherently serve a patriarchy, while nevertheless preserving something...
Dasein Gets Pregnant
In an existential analysis of Dasein, pregnancy might only be considered a factical "condition"-ontic, not ontological. In fact, it is a factical condition that affects only some members of the group human Dasein. But if my factical death, my factical...
Exercising Freedom: Kant and Foucault
For a discussion of freedom to begin with some reference to Kant is hardly surprising. Kant's work remains a standard reference for ethical or political philosophy and freedom is, as Kant puts it, the keystone to his whole system.' The appeal to Foucault...
Feminine Devotion and Self-Abandonment: Simone De Beauvoir and Soren Kierkegaard: On the Woman in Love
In spite of the fact that Kierkegaard, more than any other philosopher of the modern age, addressed questions of gender, sexual differences, self-identity, and sexual relations between men and women in his writings, he is rarely mentioned in Simone de...
Habermas's Developmental Logic Thesis: Universal or Eurocentric?
One of the more controversial elements of Jurgen Habermas's critical theory of society is the theory of social evolution. It is controversial largely because it is formulated on a developmental model, and as such it distinguishes between the logic and...
Illeity According to Levinas
Because autonomy has died, everybody knows that thought does not emerge, as a creation out of nothing, from the most common and therefore utterly uninteresting data through formal devices, but rather is a practice learnt from individual teachers and...
Intentionality without Representations: Heidegger's Account of Perception
Most commentators would agree that Heidegger is what one might call an "antirepresentationalist" about intentional states, including perception.1 This is a view which Carleton B. Christensen recently has attacked.2 The attack centers on the fact that...
Liberalism, Feminism, and the Promise of Lovibond's Moral Realism
As Alison Jagger showed in her masterful overview of feminist politics,1 the political liberalism of most early feminists has been attacked on many fronts. Despite the universal acceptance of the rhetoric of equal opportunity, the persistence of "glass...
Moving beyond the Face through Eros: Levinas and Irigaray's Treatment of the Woman as an Alterity
Emmanuel Levinas's "Phenomenology of Eros," in Totality and Infinity, has been the subject of much debate concerning his treatment of the feminine subject. Within his account, Levinas speaks of the (male) subject's erotic encounter with the (female)...
Nature as Origin and Difference: On Environmental Philosophy and Continental Thought
Recently the question of what insights and conceptual resources the traditions of continental philosophy might provide to contemporary environmental thought has received much attention; in this essay I would like to consider this issue, focusing in particular...
Response to Eleanore Holveck
Eleanore Holveck has been far too kind to me. I am deeply grateful and also embarrassed by what she has said about me. But in my reply I will be concerned, not with the ways in which she overstated the case, but with some of the specific points that...
Response to Margaret Simons
It was I myself who suggested Margaret Simons as a person I should be glad to have as a member of our panel. I know that we have always respected one another's work, and I was sure that we would find opportunity for debate regarding the issue she has...
Rethinking Democracy after Nietzsche
At the same time that Nietzsche's work enjoys such enthusiastic attention, his political views seem to inspire only unanimous contempt. While Martha Nussbaum, for instance, will admit that "the resurgence of interest in Nietzsche at the present time...
Sense and Icon: The Problem of Sinngebung in Levinas and Marion
It is probably no overstatement to say that phenomenology, in the Husserlian tradition, is ultimately concerned with the constitution of sense. The problematic of the constitution of sense, to put it simply, interrogates the birth of sense and the conditions...
Terror: The Space of a Savage Extreriority
Michel Foucault brought our attention to the "limit-experience" with his early work on Bataille. He did not give that name to it then and only alluded to it once afterward. But in his "Preface to Transgression," he already approached something of the...
The Birth of American Existentialism: Hazel E. Barnes, a Singular Universal
As I began to read Hazel E. Barnes' autobiography, The Story I Tell Myself,1 when it was published recently, my first impression, in addition to the very real pleasure of reading it, was the thought: here is a perfect book for undergraduate women philosophy...
The Obligation of Judgment: Kant and Derrida
According to Kant, the practical employment of reason shares with its speculative employment the characteristic feature that in using it we orient ourselves by an idea that lies beyond the conditions of experience. It is an idea of something unconditioned...
The Politics of Vulnerability: On the Role of Idealization in Butler and Habermas
The particular theory of meaning that Judith Butler espouses has a certain political cash value.' This presents an interesting parallel with Jurgen Habermas, who developed a universal pragmatic account of language in order to ground rational discourse....
What Is an Artifact?
If hermeneutical philosophy of science is to gain wider appeal, Martin Eger recently argued, its advocates need to make greater efforts to show that it leads to more insightful understanding of the kinds of practical issues and specific historical examples...