Philosophy Today

Founded in 1957, Philosophy Today is a quarterly magazine published by DePaul University. The magazine has a circulation of over 1,000 readers and specializes in information on contemporary philosophy and philosophers. The Editor of the magazine is David W. Pellauer.

Articles from Vol. 56, No. 4, November

A Note on Deleuze and Language
"Nothing is more fragile than the surface." This is how Gilles Deleuze begins the thirteenth series of his Logic of Sense dedicated to the comparison of Antonin Artaud with Lewis Carroll. He goes on to ask: "Is not this secondary organization threatened...
Deconstruction, Secularism, and Islam
Since the early 1990s, Jacques Derrida's growing attention to politics and religion has been abundantly noted. What has received far less attention is Derrida's explicit secular commitments in his discussions of religion and politics. Such commitments...
Deleuze and the Image of Thought
La pensée est comme le Vampire, elle n'a pas d'image, ni pour constituer modèle, ni pour faire copie.Deleuze & GuattariThere is a schism in the work of Gilles Deleuze. The early Deleuze of, primarily, Différence et répétition (1968), the first book...
Heidegger's Phenomenology of the Greek Gods
Martin Heidegger's long career shows a variety of engagements with philosophical thought on religion. Recent scholarship on this aspect of Heidegger's thought typically examines one of the two principal thematic strands of his engagement with this subject....
On the Nature of Concepts
In What is Philosophy? Deleuze and Guattari define philosophy, famously, as an activity that consists in "forming, inventing, and fabricating concepts."1 But this definition of philosophy implies a rather singular "analytic of the concept" (to borrow...
Renewing the Infinite Conversation: System and Method in Blanchot
Blanchot's thought is to some extent an attempt to grasp the absolute, or at least to open a conversation with the infinite. My question here is how he sets out to do that, and if I'm asking this question today with renewed emphasis it is in part because...
Sartre's Absolute Freedom in Being and Nothingness: The Problems Persist
In Being and Nothingness, Sartre distinguishes between two types of freedom. One is the freedom "to obtain what one has wished," which is the "empirical and popular concept of 'freedom.'"1 The other is the freedom "by oneself to determine oneself to...
The Strenuous and Sufficient Task of Kierkegaard's Religiousness A
To be regarded as lunatic - there's something to that - it is encouraging. It protects the quiet inwardness of an absolute relationship.'In Concluding Unscientific Postscript ( 1 846), Johannes Climacus claims that ethics and religion (which belong to...