Transactions of the American Philosophical Society

Transactions of the American Philosophical Society is a magazine focusing on Humanities

Articles from Vol. 96, No. 1, 2006

Acknowledgments
The Princess and the Patriot: Ekaterina Dashkova, Benjamin Franklin, and the Age of Enlightenment is the most ambitious exhibition the Society has organized in Philosophical Hall since it opened its doors to the public in 2001. It is our first show to...
A Man Made to Measure: Benjamin Franklin, American Philosophe
The unlikely meeting of Benjamin Franklin and Princess Ekaterina Romanovna Dashkova (1743-1810) in Paris, early in 1781, brought together two unusual figures from opposite sides of the world, separated by age, experience, and rank. By all rights of tradition...
Arduous and Delicate Task: Princess Dashkova, the Academy of Sciences, and the Taming of Natural Philosophy
Princess Ekaterina Romanovna Dashkova has been a woman more often recalled than remembered. Born in St. Petersburg in the uncertain years that followed in the wake of the tumultuous reign of Peter the Great, Dashkova proved in the second half of the...
"A Red Hot English Woman": Princess Dashkova's Love Affair with Britain
By the time Catherine II became empress of Russia in 1762, Anglomania had touched most of Europe and would gather momentum in the decades that followed. In 1758, toward the end of Empress Elizabeth's reign, an operatic version of Carlo Goldoni's play...
A Tumultuous Life: Princess Dashkova and Her Relationships with Others
Princess Ekaterina Romanovna Dashkova (born Vorontsova) was a woman of many contradictions. Her life has long attracted the attention of historians both in Russia and abroad, yet she remains elusive because much of the relevant archival material is unpublished,...
Books Make the Woman: Princess Dashkova's Moscow Library
Princess Ekaterina Romanovna Dashkova devoted much of her life to the printed word. She wrote poetry, plays, essays, travelogues, and an autobiography; edited a dictionary and academic journals; published fiction, nonfiction, and scholarly works; and...
Checklist of the Exhibition
Objects in this checklist are listed alphabetically by artist, author, or maker, with anonymous works at the beginning. Firms and institutions are included in the alphabetical listing. For published books and pamphlets, titles have been truncated, capitalization...
Foreword
The Princess and the Patriot: Ekaterina Dashkova, Benjamin Franklin, and the Age of Enlightenment is the title not only of this volume but also of an exhibition held at the Museum of the American Philosophical Society in Philosophical Hall, Philadelphia,...
Introduction: A Meeting of Minds
On February 3, 1781, Benjamin Franklin met Russian Princess Ekaterina Romanovna Dashkova at the Hôtel de la Chine in Paris. It was an unlikely meeting between two extraordinary Enlightenment figures from opposite sides of the world. She was a forthright...
Liberty Postponed: Princess Dashkova and the Defense of Serfdom
For all the diversity that distinguished imperial Russia from the American colonies in the eighteenth century, both societies shared one crucial characteristic that set them apart from Western Europe: the presence of human bondage as a mainstay of economic...
Portraits of Princess Dashkova
Although Princess Ekaterina Romanovna Dashkova lived in the eighteenth century, she was the very epitome of a modern-day woman-a manager, publisher, and businesswoman. Because of her bold personality and unusual accomplishments, especially in science...
Selected Dashkova Bibliography
The following is not a comprehensive bibliography on either Dashkova or Franklin. For Dashkova, it consists of published books and articles selected by the catalogue authors and the editor, focusing especially on English-language sources and on themes...
Virtue Must Advertise: Self-Presentation in Princess Dashkova's Memoirs
Princess Ekaterina Romanovna Dashkova was one of the most colorful and striking figures of the age of Catherine the Great, itself an epoch of oversize personalities. "Catherine the Little," as Dashkova refers to herself in her memoirs, was-next to the...