Vanderbilt Law Review

Vanderbilt Law Review is a magazine focusing on Law

Articles from Vol. 58, No. 6, November

"Gouging the Government": Why a Federal Contingency Fee Lobbying Prohibition Is Consistent with First Amendment Freedoms
I. INTRODUCTIONWashington Post writer David Segal once observed, "[f]or most Americans the words 'Washington lobbyist' have roughly the same cachet as, say, 'deadbeat dad."'1 Both lawmakers and the public regard lobbying as an unsavory part of the political...
Racial Integration and Community Revitalization: Applying the Fair Housing Act to the Low Income Housing Tax Credit
At the heart of a debate about the future of American race, housing, and urban policy are two important lawsuits recently filed in state courts in New Jersey and Connecticut. Plaintiffs challenge the authority of their respective state housing finance...
Rethinking Place of Business as Choice of Law in Class Action Lawsuits
I. INTRODUCTIONIn the past century, businesses have come to operate on a national and often global level. In the past century, the United States has seen an enormous nationalization and even globalization of business. As a result, the actions of a single...
The Strategic Use of Mexico to Restrict South American Access to the Diversity Visa Lottery
I. INTRODUCTIONIn 1990, Congress enacted the Family Unity and Employment Opportunity Act (the "1990 Act"), which created a visa lottery to enhance the diversity of the immigrant stream and to ensure that areas of the world sending relatively few immigrants...
The Untold Story of the Rest of the Americans with Disabilities Act
Nearing the fifteenth birthday of the Americans with Disabilities Act ("ADA"), most commentators believe that its overall effects have been disappointing. By this point, there is a standard set of explanations for the ADA's failures: the Supreme Court's...