Psychonomic Bulletin & Review

Provides broad range of topics in all areas of experimental psychology. The journal publishes theory and review articles, reports on experimental work, and coverage of methods in all areas.

Articles from Vol. 12, No. 4, August

A Psychometric Approach to Intuitive Physics
The literature on intuitive physics shows that many people exhibit systematic errors when predicting the behavior of simple physical events. Most previous research has attributed these errors to factors specific to a certain class of tasks. In the present...
Attentional Rubbernecking: Cognitive Control and Personality in Emotion-Induced Blindness
Emotional stimuli often attract attention, but at what cost to the processing of other stimuli? Given the potential costs, to what degree can people override emotion-based attentional biases? In Experiment 1, participants searched for a single target...
Attention Capture Is Modulated in Dual-Task Situations
Because some features affect the efficiency of visual search even when they are irrelevant to the task, they are thought to capture attention in a stimulus-driven manner. If such attention shifts are stimulus driven, they should be unaffected by reduced...
Basic Processes in Reading: A Critical Review of Pseudohomophone Effects in Reading Aloud and a New Computational Account
There are pervasive lexical influences on the time that it takes to read aloud novel letter strings that sound like real words (e.g., brane from brain). However, the literature presents a complicated picture, given that the time taken to read aloud such...
Hemispheric Asymmetry in Temporal Resolution: Contribution of the Magnocellular Pathway
Right-handed participants performed simple visual judgments on nonverbal stimuli presented either to the left visual field-right hemisphere (LVF-RH) or to the right visual field-left hemisphere (RVF-LH). The stimuli were exposed for 40-120 msec, followed...
Integrated versus Segregated Accounting and the Magnitude Effect in Temporal Discounting
Temporal discounting rates in humans generally decrease as the amount of reward increases, a phenomenon known as the magnitude effect. In the present study, we examined whether temporal discounting and the magnitude effect are related to segregation...
Is Size Perception Based on Monocular Distance Cues Computed Automatically?
The study reported here examined whether size perception based on monocular distance cues is computed automatically. Participants were presented with a picture containing distance cues, which was superimposed with a pair of digits differing in numerical...
Modeling Individual Differences in Cognition
Many evaluations of cognitive models rely on data that have been averaged or aggregated across all experimental subjects, and so fail to consider the possibility of important individual differences between subjects. Other evaluations are done at the...
Notional Number Agreement in English
To investigate the contested role of notional number in English subject-verb agreement, we used a sentence completion task to examine agreement with minimally different subject noun-phrases, such as the gang on the motorcycles and the gang near the motorcycles....
Resistance Is Futile: The Unwitting Insertion of Analogical Inferences in Memory
Analogical inferences can modify people's understanding, but can this occur even when the inferences are unpalatable? We report two experiments suggesting that this is the case. Participants read a source passage on the role and status of gay people...
Response-Response Compatibility during Bimanual Movements: Evidence for the Conceptual Coding of Action
The present study investigated response-response (R-R) compatibility in a bimanual keypressing task. Numeric and spatial stimuli were used to cue responses for each hand. Two groups of participants differed in terms of the stimulus-response mappings...
Revisiting the Role of Recollection in Item versus Forced-Choice Recognition Memory
Many memory theorists have assumed that forced-choice recognition tests can rely more on familiarity, whereas item (yes-no) tests must rely more on recollection. In actuality, several studies have found no differences in the contributions of recollection...
Speeded Retrieval Abolishes the False-Memory Suppression Effect: Evidence for the Distinctiveness Heuristic
We examined two different accounts of why studying distinctive information reduces false memories within the DRM paradigm. The impoverished relational encoding account predicts that less memorial information, such as overall familiarity, is elicited...
The Role of Contextual Cues in the Haptic Perception of Orientations and the Oblique Effect
Blindfolded right-handed participants were asked to position, with the right hand, a frontoparallel rod to one of three orientations: vertical (0°) and left 45° and right 45° obliques. Simultaneously, three different backgrounds were explored with the...
The Role of Working Memory in Attentional Capture
Much previous research has demonstrated that visual search is typically disrupted by the presence of a unique "singleton" distractor in the search display. Here we show that attentional capture by an irrelevant color singleton during shape search critically...
The Role of Working Memory in Spatial Enumeration: Patterns of Selective Interference in Subitizing and Counting
Articulatory suppression (repeatedly pronouncing a syllable or word while carrying out another task) is thought to interfere selectively with the phonological store in working memory (Larsen & Baddeley, 2003). Although suppression interferes with...
The Time It Takes to Switch Attention
An experiment is reported that measured the time it takes to switch attention from one set of locations to another in response to a cue that indicates the relevant locations. The experiment compared sequences of trials in which the same locations were...
The Wall Inside the Brain: Overestimation of Distances Crossing the Former Iron Curtain
A study of distance estimations between German cities investigated the organization of mental maps and their specific deviations from reality. Potential factors for the deviation of mental maps from reality are physical barriers, emotional involvement,...
Using Context to Build Semantics
Latent semantic analysis (LSA) is a model of knowledge representation for words. It works by applying dimension reduction to local co-occurrence data from a large collection of documents after performing singular value decomposition on it. When the reduction...
What Is Preexisting Strength? Predicting Free Association Probabilities, Similarity Ratings, and Cued Recall Probabilities
Measuring lexical knowledge poses a challenge to the study of the influence of preexisting knowledge on the retrieval of new memories. Many tasks focus on word pairs, but words are embedded in associative networks, so how should preexisting pair strength...