Psychonomic Bulletin & Review

Provides broad range of topics in all areas of experimental psychology. The journal publishes theory and review articles, reports on experimental work, and coverage of methods in all areas.

Articles from Vol. 11, No. 1, February

A New Estimation of the Duration of Attentional Dwell Time
How rapidly can attention move from one object to the next? Previous studies in which the dwell time paradigm was used have estimated attentional switch times of 200-500 msec, results incompatible with the search rate estimates of 25-50 msec shown in...
Body-Based Senses Enhance Knowledge of Directions in Large-Scale Environments
Previous research has shown that inertial cues resulting from passive transport through a large environment do not necessarily facilitate acquiring knowledge about its layout. Here we examine whether the additional body-based cues that result from active...
Decomposing Serial Learning: What Is Missing from the Learning Curve?
Our current understanding of serial learning relies on the form of the learning curve and on changes in the serial position curve over repeated study-test trials (Ward, 1937). The averaging of data that produces these functions obscures the detailed...
Dissociating Sources of Dual-Task Interference Using Human Electrophysiology
In the psychological refractory period (PRP) paradigm, two unmasked targets are presented, each of which requires a speeded response. Response times to the second target (T2) are slowed when T2 is presented shortly after the first target (T1). Electrophysiological...
Effects of Perceptual Modality on Verbatim and Gist Memory
In two experiments, predictions of the fuzzy-trace theory of memory were tested. Perceptual information may play a role in retrieval and recognition processes for verbatim, but not for gist, memory. Perceptual modality effects were assessed in the present...
False Recognition without Intentional Learning
Asked to memorize a list of semantically related words, participants often falsely recall or recognize a highly related semantic associate that has not been presented (the critical lure). Does this false memory phenomenon depend on intentional word reading...
Geometrical Haptic Illusions: The Role of Exploration in the Müller-Lyer, Vertical-Horizontal, and Delboeuf Illusions
This article surveys studies of the occurrence, in the haptic modality, of three geometrical illusions well known in vision, and it discusses the nature of the processes underlying these haptic illusions. We argue that the apparently contradictory results...
Hemispheric Performance in Object-Based Attention
The goal of the present study was to investigate whether object-based attention effects differ across the cerebral hemispheres. Previous research has suggested that object-based attention is preferentially lateralized to the left hemisphere (Egly, Driver,...
How a Cognitive Psychologist Came to Seek Universal Laws
My early fascination with geometry and physics and, later, with perception and imagination inspired a hope that fundamental phenomena of psychology, like those of physics, might approximate universal laws. Ensuing research led me to the following candidates,...
Is the Asymmetry in Young Infants' Categorization of Humans versus Nonhuman Animals Based on Head, Body, or Global Gestalt Information?
Quinn and Eimas (1998) reported an asymmetry in the exclusivity of the category representations that young infants form for humans and nonhuman animals: category representations for nonhuman animal species were found to exclude humans, whereas a category...
"One-Thousand One . . . One-Thousand Two . . .": Chronometric Counting Violates the Scalar Property in Interval Timing
Weber's law applied to interval timing is called the scalar property. A hallmark of timing in the seconds-to-minutes range, the scalar property is characterized by proportionality between the standard deviation of a response distribution and the duration...
Pigeons Group Time Intervals According to Their Relative Duration
In the present research, we asked whether pigeons tended to judge time intervals not only in terms of their absolute value but also relative to a duration from which they must be discriminated (i.e., longer or shorter). Pigeons were trained on two independent...
Protected Values: No Omission Bias and No Framing Effects
Previous studies have suggested that people holding protected values (PVs) show a bias against harmful acts, as opposed to harmful omissions (omission bias). In the present study, we (1) investigated the relationship between PVs and acts versus omissions...
Randomness and Inductions from Streaks: "Gambler's Fallacy" versus "Hot Hand"
Sometimes people believe that a run of similar independent events will be broken (belief in the gambler's fallacy) but, other times, that such a run will continue (belief in the hot hand). Both of these opposite inductions have been explained as being...
Retrieval-Induced Forgetting Occurs in Tests of Item Recognition
Using the retrieval-practice paradigm (Anderson, R. A. Bjork, & E. L. Bjork, 1994), we tested whether or not retrieval-induced forgetting could be found in item recognition tests. In Experiment 1, retrieval practice on items from semantic categories...
Search for Multiple Targets: Evidence for Memory-Based Control of Attention
There are two opposing models with regard to the function of memory in visual search: a memory-driven model and a memory-free model. Recently, Horowitz and Wolfe (2001) investigated a multiple-target search task. Participants were required to decide...
Self-Evaluation as a Moderating Factor of Strategy Change in Directed Forgetting Benefits
In list method directed forgetting, instructing people to forget a studied word list usually results in better recall for a newly studied list. Sahakyan and Delaney (2003) have suggested that these benefits are due to a change in encoding strategy that...
Sensorimotor Simulations Underlie Conceptual Representations: Modality-Specific Effects of Prior Activation
According to the perceptual symbols theory (Barsalou, 1999), sensorimotor simulations underlie the representation of concepts. Simulations are componential in the sense that they vary with the context in which the concept is presented. In the present...
Spatial Perception and Control
We investigated whether the perceived vanishing point of a moving stimulus becomes more accurate as one's degree of control over the stimulus increases. Either alone or as a member of a pair, participants controlled the progression of a dot stimulus...
Spatial Simon Effects with Nonspatial Responses
Recent studies have shown that spatial Simon effects can be modulated by short-term associations that are set up as a result of task instructions. I examined whether spatial Simon effects can also be produced by short-term associations even when the...
Spatial Stimulus-Response Compatibility and Negative Priming
According to Kornblum's (1992) dimensional overlap model, when an incongruent response to a stimulus is required, automatic activation of the congruent response must first be inhibited. Shiu and Kornblum (1996a) provided evidence for such inhibition...
Testing Quantitative Models of Backward Masking
We analyzed the relationship between U-shaped and monotonic-shaped masking functions, using both computer simulations of quantitative models and experimental data. Our analysis revealed that quantitative models of backward masking predict that U-shaped...
The Beck Effect Is Back, Now in Color: A Demonstration
It has been repeatedly found (e.g., Beck, 1982; Beck & Ambler, 1973) that a tilted T is detected better than an L when presented on the background of a number of upright Ts, although in isolation both are discriminated from an upright T about equally...
The Effects of Accountability on Bias in Physician Decision Making: Going from Bad to Worse
Members of the Iowa Academy of Family Physicians participated in a survey study in which they were asked to make hypothetical decisions in either high- or low-conflict treatment conditions. In the low-conflict treatment condition the options were a common...
The Role of Spurious Feature Familiarity in Recognition Memory
In two experiments, we investigated the role of perceptual information in spurious recognition judgments. Participants viewed lists of words in various unusual fonts. The frequency with which each font was presented was manipulated at study: Each font...
The Self-Choice Effect from a Multiple-Cue Perspective
The self-choice effect refers to the fact that self-chosen items are remembered better than experimenter-assigned items (Takahashi, 1991). The present study investigated the hypothesis that (a) response choice involves relational processing as activation...
Top-Down Search Strategies Cannot Override Attentional Capture
Bacon and Egeth (1994) have claimed that color singletons do not interfere with search for a shape singleton when, instead of using a singleton detection mode, participants are forced to use a feature search mode. Bacon and Egeth induced a feature search...