Texas Review of Law & Politics

Texas Review of Law & Politics is a magazine focusing on Law

Articles from Vol. 13, No. 2, Spring

Identity Burglary
I. IntroductionThe growing prevalence of identity theft has inspired some academics to label the trend "an epidemic,"1 and "a national crisis," prompting every U.S. jurisdiction to respond by statutorily criminalizing identity theft.3 However, notwithstanding...
Not All Violence Is Commerce: Noneconomic, Violent Criminal Activity, Rico, and Limitations on Congress under the Post Raich Commerce Clause
I. INTRODUCTIONFollowing the Supreme Court's decision in Gonzales v. Raich,1 the crucial question in Commerce Clause jurisprudence is whether any activity still remains outside the reach of Congress' interstate commerce power. A recent First Circuit...
On the Freedom of a Congregation: Legal Considerations When Lutherans Look to Change Denominational Affiliation
I. INTRODUCTIONOver one hundred parishes and four dioceses have chosen to leave the Episcopalian Church (USA) since the ordination of openly gay Rev. Gene Robinson as Bishop of New Hampshire. The United Methodist Church,2 the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.),5...
Pakistan's Ultimate Nightmare Scenario: Preventing Islamic Extremists from Acquiring Nuclear Weapons
I. INTRODUCTIONThe burning embers of the World Trade Center had barely setded over the lower Manhattan skyline when Washington insiders were already convinced that the next terrorist attack would be nuclear. For many, it was not a question of if, but...
Preface
Our country faces significant challenges. The solutions proposed by the current administration would move the United States toward the 'security' end of the freedom-security spectrum. At the Review, we hope that diese measures will not stifle the economic...
Rluipa and Eminent Domain: How a Plain Reading of a Flawed Statute Creates an Absurd Result
ABSTRACTThis Article addresses the Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act of 2000 (RLUIPA). It argues that while courts hearing RLUIPA cases have correctly held that eminent domain is not land use regulation under RLUIPA, Congress did intend...
The Invisible Constitution
THE INVISIBLE CONSTITUTION. Laurence H. Tribe. Oxford University Press, 2008. Pp. 278. $19.95.Perhaps no academic is more closely associated with the idea of an "invisible" constitution than Harvard Law School's Laurence H. Tribe. Through his public...
The Supreme Court's Perversion of Equality
I. INTRODUCTION"'With five votes around here you can do anything,' [Justice] Brennan would tell his clerks."1Throughout recorded history and probably from time immemorial, coundess people have sought equality of treatment under custom and law.2 In the...