International Journal of Psychoanalysis

Peer reviewed journal publishing scholary articles on methodologies, theories, and history of psychoanalysis.

Articles from Vol. 90, No. 6, December

Between Physical Desire and Emotional Involvement: Reflections on Frédéric Fonteyne's Film Une Liaison Pornographique1
From a psychoanalytic vantage point, some of the main features of films dealing with the representation of intimate relationships can be schematically subsumed under three categories.The first category concerns the exploration of the psychodynamic characteristics...
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Child versus Adult Psychoanalysis: Two Processes or One?
Child analysis continues to be seen as a different technique from adult analysis because children are still involved in a developmental process and because the primary objects continue to play active roles in their lives. This paper argues that this...
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Melanie Klein's Letters Addressed to Marcelle Spira (1955-1960)1
Between 1955 and 1960, Melanie Klein wrote some 45 hitherto unpublished letters to Marcelle Spira, the Swiss psychoanalyst living at that time in Geneva. In 2006, after Spira's death, these letters were deposited with the Raymond de Saussure Psychoanalysis...
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Performative and Enactive Features of Psychoanalytic Witnessing: The Transference as the Scene of Address
This paper will attempt to broaden the conception of witnessing in analytic work with traumatized patients by extending the idea to incorporate the patient's developing and varied capacity for witnessing, as well as a witnessing that occurs within the...
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Postponing Trauma: The Dangers of Telling
Surviving a major historical trauma has consequences that are difficult to live with. Survivors who remain silent are often condemned to a desiccated existence, a dried-out life, a death in life. Survivors who speak out run an even greater risk. Telling...
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Technique and Final Cause in Psychoanalysis: Four Ways of Looking at One Moment
This paper argues that if one considers just a single clinical moment there may be no principled way to choose among different approaches to psychoanalytic technique. One must in addition take into account what Aristotle called the final cause of psychoanalysis,...
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The French Model of Psychoanalytic Training: Ethical Conflicts1
Research on psychoanalytical education within the IPA may be clarified by reflecting on the ethic behind each of the three main models (Eitingonian, French and Uruguayan). In fact, the ethic underpinning psychoanalytical education, whatever the model,...
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The Presence of Spinoza in the Exchanges between Sigmund Freud and Romain Rolland1
Although Freud recognized his profound affinity with Spinoza, we seldom find explicit and direct references to the philosopher in his works. The correspondence between Romain Rolland, the 'Christian without a church', and Freud, the 'atheist Jew', is...
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The Relationship of the Inner and the Outer in Psychoanalysis
What is internal and what is external according to psychoanalytic theory? This is a surprisingly complicated question. The terminology is often ambiguous and inconsistent as, for instance, in the use of terms like 'object' and 'other'. The relationship...
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Thoughts on Representation in Therapy of Holocaust Survivors1
This paper presents the problems of representation and lack of representation in treating Holocaust survivors, through clinical vignettes and various theoreticians. The years of Nazi persecution and murder brought about a destruction of symbolization...
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Trauma Theory in Sándor Ferenczi's Writings of 1931 and 1932(1)
The author states that it is Ferenczi's writings of 1931 and 1932 that exhibit the most conspicuous departures from Freud's ideas and at the same time contain Ferenczi's most original contributions. The texts concerned - Confusion of tongues between...
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When the Third Is Dead: Memory, Mourning, and Witnessing in the Aftermath of the Holocaust1
The origins of psychoanalysis, as well as the concerns of our daily endeavors, center on engagement with the fate of the unbearable - be it wish, affect, or experience. In this paper, I explore psychological states and dynamics faced by survivors of...
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