Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society

Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society is a magazine focusing on Humanities

Articles from Vol. 149, No. 4, December

Bela Julesz
19 FEBRUARY 1928 * 31 DECEMBER 2003BELA JULESZ selected the famous adage by Horace, Non omnis moriar (Not all of me shall die), as the epigraph to the prologue he wrote for the re-publication of his classic book Foundations of Cyclopean Perception, only...
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Besting Malthus: The Green Revolution1
THE SECOND HALF of the twentieth century brought economic development policies and investments into prominence. For the first time in modern history, international (multilateral) institutions were created for the specific purpose of achieving economic...
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Beyond Mice and Menus1
THE MOUSE-the computer mouse, that is-was invented in the mid-1960s and was first demonstrated in a computer-based editing system in 1968. The videotape of that demonstration, which, like much else now, may be found on the "Web" (NLS:demo 2004), is fascinating...
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Francis D. Moore
17 AUGUST 1913 * 24 NOVEMBER 2001I FIRST MET FRANCIS D. (FRANNY) MOORE in 1960, when he was forty-seven years old and at the peak of his legendary career at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Boston. I was thirty-four years old and had completed my surgical...
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Francis James Herbert Haskell
7 APRIL 1928 * 18 JANUARY 2000MY FIRST ENCOUNTER with Francis Haskell came in the form of his publication Patrons and Painters. My first meeting with him followed a lecture he delivered in New York in the late 1980s on the subject of Giambattista Tiepolo's...
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Frederick Chapman Robbins
25 AUGUST 1916 * 4 AUGUST 2003FREDERICK CHAPMAN ROBBINS, an international leader in virology, pediatrics, infectious diseases, vaccinology, epidemiology, and health policy, died on 4 August 2003, three weeks before his eighty-seventh birthday. The 1954...
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Glenn Seaborg
19 APRIL 1912 * 25 FEBRUARY 1999GLENN SEABORG had a life that must have been imagined by a Hollywood director. He was a scientist who discovered or was a co-discoverer of ten new elements, one of which ended a world war and two of which are in use today...
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Hatten S. Yoder Jr
20 MARCH 1921 * 2 AUGUST 2003HATTEN S. YODER JR., a member of the American Philosophical Society since 1979, died on 2 August 2003, at Suburban Hospital, Bethesda, Md., with his family, colleagues, and friends at his side. His death followed complications...
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Introduction to Symposium on Issues in Agriculture1
MEETING THE DEMAND for food and an adequate diet for the people of the world is one of the greatest challenges facing the global community. The current world population is something more than six billion. It is expected to rise to between nine and ten...
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J. Kirk T. Varnedoe
18 JANUARY 1946 * 14 AUGUST 2003Modernist against the Current"COMET" was the title Kirk Varnedoe chose for his essay on Jackson Pollock's brilliant, brief career. The description seems only too apt for Varnedoe himself. He began his career in 1967 with...
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John W. Tukey
10 JUNE 1915 * 26 JULY 2000JOHN WILDER TUKEY, a mathematician and statistician, played many roles. In addition to his research work at Princeton University, he served four successive four-year terms as scientific adviser to the president of the United...
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Scientific and Technical Constraints on Agricultural Production: Prospects for the Future1
PRIOR TO THE BEGINNING of the twentieth century, almost all increases in crop and animal production occurred as a result of increases in the area cultivated. By the end of the century almost all increases were coming from increases in land productivity-in...
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The Political Process of Factionalism and Self-Governance at Santa Clara Pueblo, New Mexico
FACTIONALISM was (and is) a persistent and dynamic process in the social and political relations within Pueblo society. Edward P. Dozier, a member of Santa Clara Pueblo and a cultural anthropologist, emphasized that in spite of internal dissent Pueblo...
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Treaties, Intellectual Property, Market Power, and Food in the Developing World1
INDUSTRIALIZED COUNTRIES have instituted strong systems of intellectual property rights, heavily subsidize their farmers and farm exports, and have created the World Trade Organization to ensure international adherence to their trade interests. They...
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Unleashing the Genius of the Genome to Feed the Developing World1
THE PROSPECT of another agricultural revolution evokes both hope and fear. The first agricultural revolution-the domestication of edible plants-began a long process of narrowing the genome of plants for farming. Centuries of selecting, crossbreeding,...
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