Japanese Journal of Religious Studies

Japanese Journal of Religious Studies is a magazine focusing on Japanese Religious Studies

Articles from Vol. 34, No. 1, 2007

Christianity and Gender Relationships in Japan: Case Studies of Marriage and Divorce in Early Meiji Protestant Circles
It is accepted that Victorian attitudes to love, chastity, marriage, and the family, all rooted in Christianity, played an important part in changing norms of behavior related to gender relationships in Meiji Japan. But writers on Christianity in Meiji...
Christian Prophecy in Japan: Uchimura Kanzo
Uchimura Kanzo (1861-1930) was an extremely accomplished Meiji Christian convert who emphasized a Christianity he considered in tune with traditional Japanese religiosity and free of Western influence. When a child, he observed his family's distress...
Christians in Japan
(ProQuest-CSA LLC: ... denotes non-USASCII text omitted.)IN SEPTEMBER 2005 the Department of Asian Studies at the University of British Columbia hosted a remarkable two-day symposium somewhat grandly titled, "Experiences With and Within: Christians in...
Japanese Immigrants and Their Christian Communities in North America: A Case Study of the Fukuinkai, 1877-1896
On 6 October 1877, several Japanese Christian students living in San Francisco gathered and organized the Fukuinkai (Gospel Society) for Bible study and to encourage mutual concern and support among members who shared similar difficulties and struggles....
Japan's Modern Prophet: Uchimura Kanzo
John F. Howes, Japan's Modern Prophet: Uchimura Kanzo Vancouver & Toronto: University of British Columbia Press, 2006. xvi + 445 pp. $32.95 paper, isbn 978-0774811460.BASED ON his dissertation completed in 1965, which covered the life of Uchimura...
Journey to the West
What is often called the first Japanese embassy to Europe was actually a publicity stunt conceived in 1582 by Alexandro Valignano, the inspector of the Portuguese-sponsored Asian missions of the Society of Jesus. Four teenagers from Kyushu were paraded...
Nitobe Inazo and the Sapporo Band: Reflections on the Dawn of Protestant Christianity in Early Meiji Japan
This paper focuses on the famous prewar internationalist Nitobe Inazo, and inquires into the origins of his Christian faith. Born in 1862 in Morioka in the last years of the Tokugawa period, he imbibed Christianity while attending the Sapporo Agricultural...
Tamura Naoomi's the Japanese Bride: Christianity, Nationalism, and Family in Meiji Japan
In 1893, Christian minister Tamura Naoomi provoked a heated debate among his contemporaries when he published an English-language book on Japanese family practices titled The Japanese Bride. While the book made no controversial or radical theological...
The Brotherhoods (Confrarias) and Lay Support for the Early Christian Church in Japan
By the end of the sixteenth century, the Japanese mission had become the largest overseas Christian community that was not under the rule of a European power. Its uniqueness was emphasized by Alessandro Valignano since 1582, who promoted a deeper accommodation...
The Conversion of Hideyoshi's Daughter Go
Despite the drastic curtailment of missionary activity in Japan that resulted from Toyotomi Hideyoshi's ban on Christianity in 1587, letters of the Jesuit missionaries reveal that the ban did not prevent the conversion of one lady, Go, a woman of the...
The Experiences of Christians during the Underground Years and Thereafter
This paper examines the "underground" Christians of the Edo period, looking principally at the experiences of Christians in community. It is argued that these experiences reflect a tension between the complementary realms of secrecy on the one hand and...
Toward a Modern Belief: Modernist Protestantism and Problems of National Religion in Meiji Japan
In this article, I discuss the significance of religious liberalism and reformism of Meiji Protestantism at the turn of the twentieth century. The period, I argue, is crucial to understanding Japanese Protestantism as modernist. The survival and expansion...