The New Crisis

Articles from Vol. 106, No. 4, July/August

150 Year-Old Secrets: Ohio's Legacy of the Underground Railroad
...I heard the cry of hounds... With a halloo, I piled the crowd into the boat, only to find it so small it would not carry all of us. Two men were left on the bank. . . Those words belonged to John P. Parker, a former Kentucky slave and one of Ohio's...
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An NAACP Crisis Timeline: 1909-1954
1909 Feb. 12 - The forerunner of the NAACP - the National Negro Committee - is founded on the 100th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln's birth. It is largely the brainchild of three people: William English Walling, a wealthy southerner, Socialist and writer...
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Black America: Still Searching for Identity
Merely a century and a half after Emancipation, Black America finds itself still shackled to ideas and images of itself that White America originates or filters. It is hard, perhaps even impossible, for African Americans to define themselves proactively...
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Black Monday: The NAACP's Finest Hour
Monday, May 17, 1954. Howard University Professor John Hope Franklin received a call from his wife telling him that the Supreme Court had overturned the doctrine of separate-but-equal schools in the landmark Brown v Board of Education decision. That...
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Dear Fellow Members
The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People is 90 years old this year and we join you in celebration of these nine decades. They have been years of great success, tempered with sadness. We are sobered by the knowledge that there is...
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Enolia McMillan
Ms. Mac believes no mountain too high. With an elegant air and wistful spirit, Enolia McMillan, nine years after her retirement from the NAACP, is quiet and unassuming, moving cautiously with the help of a cane, from room to room in the spacious home...
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Gospel: The Root of Popular Music
The foundation of twentieth-century black popular music is rooted in the sounds of several folk styles, including black minstrel and vaudeville tunes, blues, and ragtime. The music of the African-American church, however, has played one of the most significant...
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I Have Seen Black Hands
I I am black and I have seen black hands, millions and millions of them, Out of millions of bundles of wool and flannel tiny black fingers have reached restlessly and hungrily for life. Reached out for the black nipples at the black breasts of black...
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Letters
Clinton Lackeys Laughable It is laughable that you and the Clinton Lackeys in Washington can speak of the "The American People" voting this man into office. But that's typical behavior for Democrats and left-wingers in general. Any lie will suffice to...
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On the Fields of France
A One-Act Play by Joseph S. Cotter, Jr. This one-act play was written by Joseph Seamon Cotter, Jr., who died in 1919. This play was published posthumously, June 1920, in The Crisis. PERSON REPRESENTED A WHITE AMERICAN OFFICER A COLORED AMERICAN OFFICER...
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Paul Collins-An Original American Artist
Paul Collins knows exactly who he is, having been born and raised in the smalltown atmosphere of Grand Rapids, Mich., by his loving mother, where he made strong life-long friendships. Eagle Scout, athlete, cheerful, willing to please and help, not the...
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Quilting a Legacy
Beverly and I arrived at Alice Walker's Victorian row house on a pleasant, rainy Sunday afternoon. Alice has a gentle, quiet personality, and the sound of her voice is very soothingand the peaceful aura that surrounds her also draws you in. I quietly...
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Regional Roundup
Regions II & VII (II) Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont (VII) District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia NO HOLIDAY FOR DR. KING IN WALLINGFORD Wallingford, Conn.,...
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The Lincoln Day Call 1909
"The celebration of the Centennial of the birth of Abraham Lincoln, widespread and grateful as it may be, will fail to justify itself if it takes no note of and makes no recognition of the colored men and women for whom the great Emancipator labored...
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The "New Negro": The Past and the Crisis
At the turn of the century Booker T. Washington had written about the "New Negro," the black man of the twentieth century. Though his vision was clear, his timing was off. It was not until the cataclysmic changes and unprecedented imputs of World World...
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The Story of the African American Press
American newspapers and magazines published by African Americans focused on black political, social, and cultural issues. The Black Press has represented the spectrum of African American opinion for nearly 150 years. The black press has enabled African...
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Third World Visionaries of the 20th Century
Mohandas K. Gandhi ( 1869-1948) APOSTLE OF PEACE AND NON-VIOLENCE "Generations to come will scarce believe that such a one as this ever in flesh and blood walked upon this earth."-Albert Einstein Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was among India's most fervent...
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Turn of the Century: White Race Crimes Engulf Nation 1900-1908
"The period beginning in the nineties (1890's) and extending through the first decade of the 20th Century was...a period in which the Negro was forced to accept a status similar to a subordinate caste in the South. It was during this period that the...
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University Presses: Finding Good Reading
University presses offer readers a chance to explore well-written and specialized books on history, art and the sciences, books that go beyond the feel-good reading found on too many best-seller lists. Here is a sample of some of these thoughtful books...
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Visions of Harlem: Morgan and Marvin Smith
During the 1930s, '40s, and '50s, Harlem spread itself before the cameras of Morgan and Marvin Smith like a great tablecloth, and eagerly they went about devouring what it had to offer. The twin brothers had arrived from Kentucky at the zenith of the...
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W.E.B. Du Bois: Sage of the Century
A SEVENTH SON After the Egyptian and Indian, the Greek and Roman, the Teuton and Mongolian, the Negro is a sort of seventh son, born with a veil, and gifted with second-sight in this American world-a world which yields him no true self-consciousness,...
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White Crimes, Black Loyalty
An alien from outer space, after some study of race relations in America, would have difficulty understanding the high level of loyalty African Americans have to the United States, i.e., to white America. Indeed, this is a puzzlement even for terrestrials....
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