The American Journal of Economics and Sociology

The American Journal of Economics and Sociology publishes scholarly essays in the social sciences, with an emphasis on the intersection of sociology and economics. Also included are book reviews and profiles of historical figures.

Articles from Vol. 70, No. 3, July

A Pluralist Alternative: Mexican Women, Migration, and Regional Development
This article explores Mexican migration and its relation to the female head of household phenomenon of rural migrant communities from a post-colonialist, feminist, and institutional post-Keynesian approach to economic development. This article has...
Do Unions Affect Labor's Share of Income: Evidence Using Panel Data
Introduction The impact of unions on the functional distribution of income has been widely debated by economists. Orthodox economists generally argue that rather than reducing profits, union wage gains come at the expense of non-union workers (Pencavel...
Earnings Management and Cultural Values
Introduction Aspects of national culture have been related to many areas of economics and management, such as foreign investment decisions (Tahir and Larimo 2004), international trade (Lewer and Van den Berg 2007), and economic growth (pryor 2005)....
Explaining the Normality of Informal Employment in Ukraine: A Product of Exit or Exclusion?
Introduction In recent decades, it has been widely recognized that informal employment is a sizeable and expanding sphere of the contemporary global economy (Charmes 2009; Feige and Urban 2008; ILO 2002a, 2002b; Jutting and Laiglesia 2009; Rodgers...
Field Perspectives on the Causes of Low Employment among Less Skilled Black Men
Introduction For decades, academics and policymakers have decried the employment crisis among less skilled African American men) Only half of working-age black men without a high school degree were employed in 2006 as compared to 80 percent of similar...
Mexican Women and Work on Both Sides of the U.S.-Mexican Border
Mexican-born women in the United States appear to participate in the labor force at rates substantially higher than do Mexican women resident in Mexico. Recent measures of Mexican women's labor force participation include the ILO (2007) report that...
Social Capital across European Countries: Individual and Aggregate Determinants of Group Membership
Introduction Social capital, defined as trust, norms, and networks that facilitate coordinated action for a mutual benefit, has drawn attention because it highlights the importance of participation, cooperation, and trust amongst economic agents...
Time Use, Exploitation, and the Dual-Career Household: Competing Perspectives
Introduction In this article we explore work-time and the household, evaluating Laibman's Marxian political economy approach, and contrasting it with two preference-based treatments of time use and labor supply. (1) We focus on men and women in...
Women's Employment: Joining Explanations Based on Individual Characteristics and on Contextual Factors
Introduction The dramatic increase in women's activity and employment rates explains a large part of the secular increase in labor supply that took place during the second half of the 20th century in many industrial countries. It constitutes one...
Work Is a Four-Letter Word: The Economics of Work in Historical and Critical Perspective
Introduction The question as to why people work has been answered in a remarkably consistent way in the history of economic thought. People, it has been argued, have only extrinsic motives for work. They work not because they have any desire to...