Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers

Publication covering women and literature.

Articles from Vol. 20, No. 1-2, January-June

Legacy Bookshelf
Below is a selected sampling of current books, articles, and dissertations relevant to the study of American women writers from the seventeenth through the early twentieth centuries. Prices unless otherwise indicated are for hardcover editions. ...
Memorial Narratives of African Women in Antebellum New England
It is a telling irony that some of the earliest American narratives to record the lives of Africans in America were prompted by the deaths of those early subjects. These accounts of lives lived in bondage and in freedom were completed without any opportunity...
Race-Ing toward Civilization: Sexual Slavery and Nativism in the Novels of Pauline Elizabeth Hopkins and Alice Wellington Rollins
The ongoing work of restoring "lost" nineteenth-century women writers to the American literary canon often yields the added benefit of bringing to light experiences of ethnic groups left out of the dominant narrative of American identity. The opportunity...
Refashioning the Mind: The Revolutionary Rhetoric of Voltairine De Cleyre
A revolution means some great and subversive change in the social institutions of a people, whether sexual, religious, political, or economic. The movement of the Reformation was a great religious revolution; a profound alteration in human thought,--a...
Science in Catharine Maria Sedgwick's Hope Leslie
"Philosophers may inquire into the process of nature, and find out, if they can, how such sudden changes are produced, though, after all, I fancy their inquiries will turn out like the experiment of the inquisitive boy, who cut open the drum to find...
Sentimentalism and Sui Sin Far
Perhaps it was because some "funny people" saw Sui Sin Far, the earliest known American author of Chinese ancestry to write in English, struggling to survive and publish that they advised her to "trade upon" her "nationality." As she relates in her...
"The Animating Influences of Discord": Margaret Fuller in 1844
On 20 December 1844, readers of the New York Tribune, engaged by the usual miscellany of a newspaper--an article on prison reform by Lydia Maria Child, news of anti-slavery activities in Kentucky, and notices about lectures and amusements--would have...
The Censored and Uncensored Literary Lives of Life in the Iron-Mills
"Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these, ye have done it unto me." Mitchell, quoting Jesus (Matt. 25.36; Davis Life in the Iron-Mills) Rebecca Blaine Harding (not yet Davis) must have been a bit dismayed when she read her...
The Courtesies of Authorship: Hannah Adams and Authorial Ethics in the Early Republic
In 1814, twenty-five years after Isaiah Thomas printed the first indigenous American novel and five years before Washington Irving proved that professional literary authorship in America was viable, John Lowell published an anonymous review of a text...
The Politics of Vision in Caroline Kirkland's Frontier Fiction
The nineteenth-century science of optics may seem incongruous in a discussion of Michigan novelist Caroline M. Kirkland, who is best known for work in three closely connected, mutually reinforcing traditions: regionalism, local color writing, and realism....
"Unnatural Unions": Picturesque Travel, Sexual Politics, and Working-Class Representation in "A Night under Ground" and "Life in the Iron-Mills"
On December 19, 1860, the Atlantic Monthly arrived in Rebecca Harding Davis's hometown of Wheeling, West Virginia, including among its offerings a story entitled "A Night Under Ground" an erotically charged picturesque travel narrative detailing one...