Library Philosophy and Practice

Articles from Vol. 7, No. 1, Fall

Assessing Library Instruction Assessment Activities
Introduction Common questions that instruction librarians may ask before creating an assessment instrument for their classes are, "What are other libraries doing?" or "What should I ask and what question(s) will really assess outcomes?" As a continuing...
Digital Reference: What the Past Has Taught Us and What the Future Will Hold
In his 1876 paper, "Personal Relations Between Librarians and Reader," Samuel Green wrote that it is essential to provide reference assistance to help users locate information because the public is not trained to find information (Bopp & Smith,...
Making Your Library's Website Accessible
Libraries strive to provide access to information for patrons regardless of age, ability, socio-economic status, cognitive skill, and other potential discriminatory criteria. Accommodating the disabled can be a challenge for libraries. Nationwide,...
Studying the Reader/researcher without the Artifact: Digital Problems in the Future History of Books
Introduction It is salient to begin this article with some examples of fertile and groundbreaking study emanating from the history of the book, reading, and publishing: * Robert Darnton brilliantly re-constructed the world-view of 18th century...
The Future in Context: How Librarians Can Think like Futurists
It is no secret that our busy schedules can keep us from seeing the forest for the trees. Often we are too much focused on present problems, and too committed to and involved with current processes, to see how we may better prepare for the future....