Victorian Poetry

Journal publishing scholary articles on topics related to Victorian poetry and poets.

Articles from Vol. 47, No. 4, Winter

A Theory of Poetry: Swinburne's "A Dark Month"
Whether Swinburne's poetry bears any substantial meaning or referentiality to the world outside of it has been one of the central questions Swinburne scholars have dealt with since the very beginning of Swinburne scholarship. George Meredith's view...
Brothers in Paradox: Swinburne, Baudelaire, and the Paradox of Sin
The literary and personal relationship between Algernon Charles Swinburne and Charles Baudelaire appears both signigicant and ill-defined. An often-stressed connection focuses on Baudelaire's Les Fleurs du Mal and Swinburne's erotic poetry, but lacks...
Cosmopolitan Republican Swinburne, the Immersive Poet as Public Moralist
"Rooted cosmopolitanisnm," a paradoxical concept that gained currency in the 1990s, has recently garnered revived attention as theorists address the shortcomings apparent in cosmopolitanism more conventionally conceived--for instance, its inclination...
Erotic Figuration in Swinburne's Tristram of Lyonesse, Canto 2: The Vanishing Knight and the Drift of Butterflies
Throughout his adult life Swinburne's sexuality was the subject of much discussion, anecdote, and invention; and from Edmund Gosse's biography of the poet onward, scholars have debated and speculated about Swinburne's sex life--his conduct and its...
Intimations and Imitations of Immortality: Swinburne's "By the North Sea" and "Poeta Loquitur"
Remarkably little attention has been paid to a poem that Algernon Charles Swinburne himself preferred in "metrical and antiphonal effect" (1) to all of his previous poems. The first sustained study of "By the North Sea" (originally published in Studies...
Introduction
Part I, by Rikky Rooksby This special issue of Victorian Poetry is the first to be dedicated to Swinburne since the spring-summer 1971 number, edited by Cecil Y. Lang, which commemorated the centenary of the publication of Songs before Sunrise....
Libidinous Laureates and Lyrical Maenads: Michael Field, Swinburne and Erotic Hellenism
In 1889 "Michael Field"--the pseudonymous identity of Katharine Bradley and Edith Cooper--published Long Ago, a volume of lyric poetry based on the extant Sapphic fragments. In deference to the poet whom they called the "guardian" of the "Lesbian lyrics,"...
"Much Regrafted Pain": Schopenhauerian Love and the Fecundity of Pain in Atalanta in Calydon
Love and pain are rooted deeply in Algernon Charles Swinburne's Atalanta in Calydon (1865), and the two share such an intimate, delicate bond that they are inextricably linked. Much of the criticism dealing with the play, though, has looked primarily...
Some Reflections on the Text of Swinburne's Unfinished Novel, the So-Called "Lesbia Brandon"
It is as a poet that Swinburne holds his place in the history of English literature, but poetry was not the only medium in which his creative energy found expression. As well as several short stories, Swinburne appears to have made four attempts at...
Swinburne and Thackeray's the Newcomes
In The Home Life of Swinburne (1922), Clara Watts-Dunton, widow of Swinburne's close friend and latter-day guardian Walter Theodore Watts-Dunton, details the domestic habits and routine of the poet as she observed them at The Pines, Putney, after her...
Swinburne's "A Nympholept" in the Making
Writing to William Sharp, in October 1901, Swinburne, expressed great pleasure at finding the lengthy poem "A Nympholept included, in a "leading place," in the Tauchnitz edition of his verse, Lyrical Poems, edited by Sharp. Swinburne characterized...
Wagner, Baudelaire, Swinburne: Poetry in the Condition of Music
I. Swinburne's Ideal of Harmony Have you practiced so long to learn to read? Have you felt so proud to get at the meaning of poems? Stop this day and night with me and you shall possess the origin of all poems. Walt Whitman, Leaves...
"Will He Rise and Recover[?]": Catullus, Castration, and Censorship in Swinburne's "Dolores"
I beg you ... do not seek to castrate my poems. Than a Priapus as Cybele's priest nothing is more disgusting. --Martial, Epigrams I.35 (1) Old poets outsing and outlove us, And Catullus makes mouths at our speech. --"Dolores," ll. 339-340...