Victorian Poetry

Journal publishing scholary articles on topics related to Victorian poetry and poets.

Articles from Vol. 50, No. 4, Winter

Apocalyptic "Christmas-Eve"/ Extravagant Criticism
"Christmas-Eve" has been a difficult poem to accommodate to the Browning canon.**** It has seemed an exaggeration of the poet's excesses--too ironic and at the same time too self-satisfied, too crude in its rhythms, too simple in its resolution. Too...
Browning's Bodies and the Body of Criticism
That's my last duchess painted on the wall Gr-r-r--there go, my heart's abhorence! Just for a handful of silver he left us Vanity, saith the Preacher, vanity! That second time they hunted me No more wine? Then we'll push back chairs...
Decomposing but to Recompose: Browning, Biblical Hermeneutics, and the Dramatic Monologue
Benjamin Jowett wrote in his contribution to Essays and Reviews (1860) about the proper way to interpret the Scriptures. The reader of Scripture, he said, must overcome difficulties posed by temporal distance and linguistic and cultural difference:...
Future Directions for Robert Browning Studies: A Virtual Roundtable
In the spring of 2011 Britta and Mary Ellis invited a number of scholars of Victorian poetry to engage in an email exchange directed to the future of Browning studies. Five scholars from three continents agreed to weigh in and over the summer of 2011...
Hardy's Browning: Refashioning the Lyric
Ostensibly, Robert Browning (1812-1889) and Thomas Hardy (1840-1928) have little in common beyond their shared fascination with Percy Shelley's poetry, an idiosyncratic poetic idiom, and mutual attendance at London gatherings of literati in the 1880s....
Kipling as Browning: From Parody to Translation
Thou wouldst be king? Still fix thine eyes on mine! Paracelsus II.343 Rudyard Kipling met Robert Browning, his elder by over fifty years, twice in his early life. The first encounter took place in the early 1870s at the Grange, the villa of Kipling's...
Love among the Political Ruins: 1848 and the Political Unconscious of Men and Women
The blank interstices Men take for ruins, He will build into With pillared marbles rare, or knit across With generous arches, till the fane's complete. Casa Guidi Windows, II.776-779 (1) The roots of the implicit politics of Men and Women...
Men and Women and the Arts of Love
The two most prominent topics of Robert Browning's Men and Women (1855) are love and art. The former receives less critical attention, even though, as Wendell Stacy Johnson notes, "the specific subject of love between men and women is the major one...
Robert Browning's Debut: Ambition Expressed, Ambition Denied
When Robert Browning published Pauline in 1833, he both made--and avoided making--his poetic debut. The poem was launched into the literary world in a slender volume, between drab paper-covered boards, with a simple title: Pauline; A Fragment of a...
Robert Browning's Homesickness
Robert Browning's "Home-Thoughts, from Abroad" is conventionally known as one of the most patriotic poems in the English language. Although the poem in its original print context is the first of three dramatic monologues, it is invariably seen in popular...
The Genesis of Balaustion's Adventure
TO THE COUNTESS COWPER If I mention the simple truth: that this poem absolutely owes its existence to you,--who not only suggested, but imposed on me as a task, what has proved the most delightful of May-month amusements--I shall seem honest, indeed,...