Victorian Poetry

Journal publishing scholary articles on topics related to Victorian poetry and poets.

Articles from Vol. 51, No. 1, Spring

Dante Gabriel Rossetti's "Absurd," Antiquarian, and "Modern-Antique" Medievalism(s): Girlhood of Mary Virgin, the Bride's Prelude, and "Stratton Water"
"I wish ... that you would not attempt to defend my mediaevalisms, which were absurd, but rather say that there was enough good in the works to give assurance that these were merely superficial. My picture should be described as the 'Girlhood' &...
Meter and Context: Hardy's "Neutral Tones"
R.W. King's 1925 comment, that Thomas Hardy's well-known 1867 poem, "Neutral Tones," was distinguished by "a kind of acrid clarity in both thought and style," (1) led Claire Senior to reply that, nonetheless, "few readers today would praise Hardy for...
Tennyson's Maud (1855) and the "Unmeaning of Names": Geology, Language Theory, and Dialogics
Tennyson's Maud (1855) has had a chequered critical reception with many contemporary critics regarding the poem as odd, disturbing, and even offensive. Reactions to the poem point to how Maud has a way of drawing its readers into a dialogue that, it...
The Irony of Swinburne's Atalanta in Calydon
The reach and power of Swinburne's irony in Atalanta in Calydon remains unexamined and unappreciated. From its initial reception in 1865, the poem has been recognized for its compelling, virtuosic prosody, its theological provocativeness, its exquisite...
"The Life of Such Dead Things": Psychological Obsession in Swinburne's "Felise"
In an 1867 article for the Contemporary Review entitled The Morality of Literary Art," which lamented the current penchant of London literati for severing artistic endeavors from moral sense, science writer and literary biographer H. A. Page condemned...
Two Clocks: Aurora Leigh, Poetic Form, and the Politics of Timeliness
Elizabeth Barrett Browning's reception history demonstrates the power and the politics of timeliness. Celebrated in her own age for her poetry's formal innovations and political engagements, by the early twentieth century, Virginia Woolf could easily...