Victorian Poetry

Journal publishing scholary articles on topics related to Victorian poetry and poets.

Articles from Vol. 51, No. 2, Summer

Clough's Last Summer
One of the puzzles of Victorian literature is the eight-year silence of Arthur Hugh Clough (1819-61). He appears to have composed no verse at all between the middle of 1853 and the spring of 1861, apart from some experimental translations from Homer....
Crafting Social Criticism: Infanticide in "The Runaway Slave at Pilgrim's Point" and Aurora Leigh
What kind of poetry can promote meaningful social change? Can women rite such poetry? These are two of the questions Elizabeth Barrett Browning grappled with in her 1857 novel-poem Aurora Leigh. Romney Leigh is the voice of dissent in the poem. Early...
Tennyson with the Net Down: His "Freer" Verse
In his book The Origins of Free Verse, H.T. Kirby-Smith capaciously considers pre-twentieth century instances of the poetic species in question. Writers of potential free verse range across the centuries, from George Herbert to George Meredith, and...
The Pleasures of Looking and the Feminine Gaze in Michael Field's Sight and Song
Artistic form in all the arts tends toward music; artistic matter in all of them towards painting. It is pictures alone in which the technique is harmonious as a musician's score that lend themselves to poetry. --Edith Cooper (1) The above lines...
Thomas Hardy's Poetics of Touch
Thomas Hardy was a man who hated to be touched. Life records this fact through an observation of a childhood playmate, and continues: "This peculiarity never left him, and to the end of his life he disliked even the most friendly hand being laid on...
Victorians in Purgatory: Newman's Poetics of Conciliation and the Afterlife of the Oxford Movement
Why was John Henry Newman's The Dream of Gerontius so popular with Victorian readers? Our ingrained historicist instincts tell us that this should not necessarily have been the case. After all, The Dream is a poetic vision of purgatory, one of the...