Fordham Urban Law Journal

A bimonthly legal book published by the law school at Fordham University. Each issue focuses on a single topic, and publishes original research, critical pieces, and long-form essays related to that topic.

Articles from Vol. 34, No. 4, May

A Home of Its Own: The Role of Poverty Law in Furthering Law Schools' Missions
Eighteen years ago, I (perhaps optimistically) suggested that poverty law was "home at last" in the legal academy. (1) At that time, the American Association of Law Schools ("AALS") Section on Poverty Law was growing, which suggested that poverty law...
Community Development Clinics: What Does Poverty Have to Do with Them?
I. INTRODUCTION This Essay advocates for a more explicit link between the work of community economic development clinics and efforts to eliminate poverty. Community development clinics need to do more than teach students to be good transactional...
Creeping Impoverization: Material Conditions, Income Inequality, and ERISA Pedagogy Early in the 21st Century
INTRODUCTION To say that poverty remains one of the most pressing issues of our time is a colossal understatement. A staggering number of people on the planet live in poverty. In the United States alone, the working poor and those living at or below...
Musical Chairs and Tall Buildings: Teaching Poverty Law in the 21st Century
I. INTRODUCTION America has not yet abolished poverty. The definition and proper measure of poverty have long been a subject of controversy, and there is no consensus on how many people in the United States are poor. (1) But no one denies that the...
Poverty, Inequality, and Class in the Structural Constitutional Law Course
I. INTRODUCTION Poverty, economic inequality, class, and distributional justice are issues embedded in our constitutional history. They have animated important developments in our constitutional understandings and hold deep, though frequently unacknowledged,...
Poverty Law and Civil Procedure: Rethinking the First-Year Course
The administration of American justice is not impartial, the rich and the poor do not stand on an equality before the law, the traditional method of providing justice has operated to close the doors of the courts to the poor, and has caused a gross...
Race and Wealth Disparity: The Role of Law and the Legal System
Many authors in the forthcoming book Race and Wealth Disparities: A Multidisciplinary Discourse assume that law plays some role in the creation and maintenance of wealth disparities based upon race. (1) Yet some lawyers, judges, legislators, professors,...
Re-Conceptualizing Poverty Law Clinical Curriculum and Legal Services Practice: The Need for Generalists
--legal education sharpens the mind by narrowing it. (1) Introduction The Specialization of Poverty Law How Specialization Cheats Impoverished Clients Community-Based, Client-Centered, and Holistic Legal Services Require Generalists Providing...
Restorative Justice: How Law Schools Can Help Heal Their Communities
I. INTRODUCTION--THE LIMITATIONS OF THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE PARADIGM A. Azim Khamisa's Story (1) On Saturday night, January 21, 1995, nineteen-year-old Tariq Khamisa was delivering pizzas at DeMille's Italian Restaurant in San Diego, California....
The Pendulum Swings Back: Poverty Law in the Old and New Curriculum
INTRODUCTION Poverty law was a creation of the 1960s and in a broad sense, an outgrowth of the civil rights movement. Building on the civil rights movement's strategy of using law to effect social change, poverty lawyers sought to move beyond the...