The Nation

The Nation is a weekly magazine published by the Nation Institute. First published in 1865, The Nation is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It is the oldest weekly magazine in the U.S. to be continually published. The Nation also has bureaus in London and South Africa.Self-described as "the flagship for the left," The Nation focuses on the topics of politics and culture. Contributors of note have included Albert Einstein, Martin Luther King Jr., Gore Vidal, Christopher Hitchens, Hunter S. Thompson, Langston Hughes, Ralph Nader, Leon Trotsky, Franklin D. Roosevelt, John Steinbeck, John Maynard Keynes and Naomi Klein. The Nation has broken such notable stories as the Valerie Plane leak scandal in 2003 and several articles about the Whitewater scandal in the 1990s. It was the first U.S. publication to report on what would become the Bay of Pigs invasion. The Nation has won 24 National Magazine Awards since 1971. Katrina vanden Heuvel is Editor and Publisher. Roane Carey is Managing Editor, John Palattella is Literary Editor, Betsy Reed is Executive Editor, and Richard Lingeman and Richard Kim are Senior Editors.

Articles from Vol. 265, No. 20, December 15

Ally McBeal
It would have been nice to devote more space to Ally McBeal (Mondays, 9 P.M., Fox), a show of more interest to more people, but I just couldn't force myself to care. (Whenever there was a choice between popping in a tape of Ally or one of The New,...
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A Wing and a Prayer: Religion Goes Back to School
Governor Fob James Jr. of Alabama has promised to resist a recent federal court order prohibiting organized, officially sponsored religious activities in DeKalb County public schools. The court order, issued in Chandler v. James on October 29, includes...
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Desire and Design
'Tis shopping season again, and the mailman is bent beneath the cornucopic weight of Santasized sacks filled with glossy catalogues of goodies for sale. I read them all avidly, unable to resist their suggestion of happy transformation. Who wouldn't...
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Free Radio, Crazy Cops and Broken Windows
The people need victories (and, let's be frank, an occasional shot in the arm, like the welcome tidings of Jorge Mas Canosa's death). A useful victory comes from a federal district court in Oakland. Here, on November 12, Judge Claudia Wilken rejected...
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Gunning for Castro
Only a few weeks before the November 23 death of Jorge Mas Canosa--founder and longtime head of the hard-line Cuban American National Foundation (C.A.N.F.)--a U.S. Coast Guard patrol sighted a boat adrift in waters off the west coast of Puerto Rico....
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In Carey's Wake
For more than a decade John Van Plew, a 63-year-old Michigan cement-truck driver, fought for democracy in the Teamsters union, losing more battles than he won. In 1991 he helped elect Ron Carey president and then, with others, "sat back on our haunches...
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James Laughlin (1914-1997)
Every consideration of James Laughlin and New Directions must begin with The List: a list numbing to recite, overwhelming in its whole and astonishing in its particulars. New Directions was the publisher--and almost always the first m publisher in...
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NATO Maneuvers on Russia
This is the third in a series of articles dealing with the debate over NATO expansion; the previous installments were by Sherle R. Schwenninger (October 20) and William D. Hartung (November 24). As the Senate weighs the merits of President Clinton's...
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Putting Amtrak on Track
Thomas Downs, Amtrak's C.E.O., may be allowed a celebratory moment. The national passenger railway narrowly escaped a strike recently by the Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way workers, and the Senate and House have just passed last-minute legislation...
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Saving the Global Economy
Converging events in U.S. politics and the global economy have created a watershed moment, I believe: a time to teach and agitate but also to think anew about what is possible--and not just for Americans but for those distant others who make the goods...
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Stuck in the Station
Last month's defeat by the decisive margin of 55 to 45 percent of Houston's Proposition A, the first electoral test of public sentiment toward affirmative action since the passage of California's Proposition 209 one year ago, is emblematic of the...
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The 'Talented Tenth' in Texas: A Studied Response to a Federal Court's Ban on Affirmative Action on Campus
The death of affirmative action in higher education here in Texas has occasioned a remarkable experiment--one that may, in the end, bring more black and Latino undergraduates to the University of Texas than ever before. Put forward by Latino and black...
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The View
The topic is cream of mushroom, a casserole or some such item. "Crumble up potato chips and put them on top...." "Except I like it if you put American cheese on top-it gets all brown and crunchy." "Try the chips next party, trust me." In the Frito-Lay...
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Truth-Telling on Race
While the citizens of Houston recently flocked to the polls to turn back an attack on affirmative action, the Republican disinformation machine cranked into high gear for the next skirmish. This time its target was Professor Emeritus John Hope Franklin,...
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Welfare Day of Action
Government works its will by confusion more than consent, by calculation more than rigid control; and the meanness of its plans is not always measured best by a catalogue of horrors. In the fifteen months since Bill Clinton decreed the end of federal...
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