National Catholic Reporter

The National Catholic Reporter is a Catholic newsweekly. It was founded in 1964 and is published 44 times a year by National Catholic Reporter Publishing Company Inc.Subjects include religion. The editor is Thomas Roberts.

Articles from Vol. 31, No. 35, July 28

25th Anniversary for Ex-Priests, Wives
GARNERVILLE, New York -- Two of them had known each other since they were teens. Some had played on the same sports teams in the minor seminary. All nine had graduated from Immaculate Conception Seminary on Long Island between 1957 and 1964. And all...
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Aides Strike at Sisters of Mercy Affiliate near Detroit
FARMINGTON HILLS, Mich. -- About 60 nursing home workers who had been protesting inside the headquarters of Mercy Health Services were escorted out of the building by three city police officers here July 18. Mercy Health Services, MHS, is a health care...
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Bible Association to Curia Group: 'Tell Us Why.' (Catholic Bible Association of America Seeks Clarification of Rejected Bible Translations)
WASHINGTON--The executive board of the Catholic Biblical Association of America has asked the Vatican Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith to give a public accounting of its rejection of two English Bible translations approved by the U.S. bishops...
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Bishops Embrace Conference Change, More Openness
A dozen U.S. bishops formulated the following document over the past year, received endorsements from some 30 other bishops, and presented it to a National Conference of Catholic Bishops' ad hoc committee considering the restructuring of the NCCB and...
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Breaking out of Fear and Silence
This column is about breaking out of fear and silence; it is about expressing values and beliefs. It comes at a time when many kill one another, when hatred abounds and innocents look for light. They look to us and see us broken, too. In our church,...
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Catholic School Suit Lifts Legal Lid
A Common Pleas Court judge ruled June 20 that the Pennsylvania Labor Relations Board has jurisdiction over a labor dispute in the Philadelphia archdiocese, where a local Catholic teachers' union is claiming two elementary school teachers were fired for...
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Clinton: OK to Pray If It's Private, outside Class
WASHINGTON--President Clinton walked the tightrope between religious freedom and the separation of church and state in a July 12 memorandum in which he said "nothing in the First Amendment converts our schools into religion-free zones or requires religious...
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Conservative Bishop to Head Mexico City See
CUERNAVACA, Mexico -- The Vatican has named Norberto Rivera Carrera, the conservative bishop of Tehuacan' Puebla, to head the see of Mexico City, a move interpreted by some as a blow to the church's commitment to the poor and a victory for archconservative...
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Cultural Trivia Make the World Go Round
Ralph sleeps in a cardboard box. He eats at our soup kitchen, receives a welfare check and uses it to support his drug habit. Though he does not have a dime, he wears brand-new Nikes, $100 L.A. Raider jackets, and carries a boom box the size of a large...
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Even South Africa Drops Death Penalty
On the third day after my arrival in South Africa on a lecture tour, the Constitutional Court banned the death penalty, a punishment notorious in South Africa. The decision was 11 to 0, and the 150-page opinion of the president was followed by concurring...
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For Sex Addiction, Too, Answers Will Be Found
With regard to your editorial concerning clergy sex abuse in the March 24 NCR, perhaps I could share some thoughts with you. Forty-seven years ago, a priest founded the National Clergy Council on Alcoholism. His name was Fr. Ralph Pfau, but he was better...
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Group Promotes Affirmative Action in Church
WASHINGTON--With affirmative action policies under increasing attack in Congress and elsewhere, the National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice has stepped up its fight on behalf of minority small businesses vying for a piece of the Catholic...
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Haiti Shows It's Ready for Democracy
Imagine that two-thirds of the U.S. Senate was vacant and the terms of every member of the House of Representatives and of every local official in the United States had expired. That was the situation in Haiti before the June 25 parliamentary elections,...
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Hiroshima, Nagasaki after Atomic Blasts: Story the Smithsonian Was Not Allowed to Tell
The Smithsonian Institution's 50th anniversary commemoration of the Enola Gay and the dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, has been battered by, controversy. Military-related special interests prevailed on the Smithsonian to drop all references...
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Hiroshima's Lessons Are about the Future
With the "Enola Gay" now safely landed at the Smithsonian -- passes are required to behold the plane -- the most fractious part of the debate about Hiroshima and its 50th anniversary is past. The American Legion and others in the easily peeved military...
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Hiroshima's Long Shadow
For some there is the compulsion to talk about it, to hold it up to the light, make an exhibition of it; for others the urge is to stomp it out, sweep it under memory's carpet. The nuclear destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki is one topical case in...
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'Letter to Women' Bares John Paul's Isolation
I am of two minds about Pope John Paul II's "letter to women" -- no, make that three, First, the pope's letter is unprecedented in two ways: its apology to women for the persistence of sexism throughout human societies, including the sexism to which...
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McSorley and His Famous Friend Go Way Back
WASHINGTON--Glass cases along a wall on the top floor Georgetown University's Lauinger Library contain a surprisingly timely and provocative exhibit: "Georgetown in t he Sixties: from Pat Buchanan to the SDS." SDS was "Students for a Democratic Society."...
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Sanctions Hinder Iraq's Effort to Grow Food
BAGHDAD, Iraq--The United Nation's trade sanctions on Iraq were intended to punish a renegade state. But some observers now say the strategy is being carried to inhumane proportions by the United Nation's deliberate undermining of Iraq's attempts to...
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U.S. Man in Vatican Is Activist with Opinions
ROME -- The U.S. Embassy is "across the street from the Circus Maximus," an assistant to Ambassador Raymond Flynn said on the phone. This is the same circus where Ben Hur allegedly did his best work. Yet anyone who doesn't realize that Circus Maximus...
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