New Statesman (1996)

Articles from Vol. 127, No. 4379, April 3

A Crime That Implicates Us All
Stephen Kamlish, barrister, cuts a formidable figure. His head is shaved but stubbly, he has the torso of a rugby prop forward and his suits, slightly on the tight side, suggest raw physical power. When it comes to cross-examination, Kamlish lives up...
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Asian Values, a Fabulous Notion
The concept is a useful tool for crushing dissent and fending off criticism from democrats As Asia's leaders head for London this week some of them may be nervous about flying on their national airlines: "Asian values" may make them unsafe. Or so recent...
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A Third Way for Business, Too
Firms must attend to the needs of all their stakeholders, if they are to meet the globalisation challenge These days we are all searching for a Third Way, business included: a way of behaving and a way of surviving economically which does not depend...
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Cracking the Code for the Mystery of Life
Scientists are on the verge of a breakthrough that could alter our whole understanding of life. And it's all down to a worm Scientists in Cambridge will soon achieve one of the great landmarks in late 20th-century science Researchers all over the world...
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England 2006? Stop Wasting Money and Let Someone Else Have a Go
Over the past few months I have developed a hatred of an advertisement I have noticed at many football matches. Silly to be upset by a sign. Stupid to waste hatred on such a trivial thing. Best to ignore it. But it kept niggling me. I call it an advertisement,...
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Ever since the Cannabis Incident, the Home Secretary's Star Has Been Rising with His Leader: He's Now Tony's Official Third Way Thinker
For most of the government's senior ministers, power has had an equivocal impact on their reputations. A lively debate could be held on whether the images of the Big Three under Tony Blair - Brown, Cook and Prescott - have been enhanced or damaged since...
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Gold Stars All Round
A BBC Dickens adaptation has finally confounded all my expectations. BBC2's Our Mutual Friend concluded triumphantly on Monday (it is repeated on Saturday) and reminded all of us who had never read the book that among the Master's tricks was the trick...
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Gruesome as Boxing Is, Women Should Still Be Allowed to Do It. and Their Influence Might Be Civilising on Some Other Sports as Well
Women's boxing is hardly novel. In the thirties it was a popular music hall turn, imperilled only when avaricious East End hussies with Don King dreams wanted bucks for beatings. On learning in 1934 that Annie (KO Queen) Newton was to take on Madge Baxter...
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I May Not Know Much about Horticulture, but I Know a Lawn That Resembles a Failed Hair Transplant When I See One
In the last decades of the 18th century, when English explorers crossed the Appalachians and entered Kentucky, they found European grass waiting for them. White clover and Kentucky bluegrass (which is in fact a Eurasian grass) had spread ahead of the...
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Kundun
We're used to Scorsese heroes pacing up and down, feverishly scratching their cheeks and asking, "Are you talking to me?" or, more menacingly, "D'you think I'm funny? Funny how?" before plugging 70 rounds of lead into the unlucky bum who got in their...
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Let's Vote Next Year on Emu
The government's decision not to join the large majority of European Union member countries in entering the common currency in the first wave had some good reasons, as well as some bad ones rooted in timidity. The UK business cycle was out of kilter...
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Meet Mr. Smith, Minister for New Deals and New Dawns
The government's flagship policy to combat youth unemployment is launched nationwide this week. It was a circus, with a minister at the centre of the ring. Andrew Smith stood patiently, like a friendly horse, having his picture taken with each of the...
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On Oxford Street, Life Is Nasty, Cheap - and the Essence of Urban Spirit
Hell is other shoppers. I stand and .watch a row of double-decker buses, packed solid: a No 84, two 74s, then a 139, two 13s and another 139. They move at something between zero and one mile per hour, spewing out burnt diesel. If you ever want an advertisement...
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Racism Is Not the Only Offense
Jack Straw's Crime and Disorder Bill is dangerously flawed in its failure to recognise cultural and religious hatred Suppose some racists spray a swastika on the memorial to a murdered black teenager. If caught, they will in future be treated more severely...
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Spin-Doctors Have Been Mythologised to an Absurd Extent. A Far More Important Story Is Unfolding Behind the Campbell Row
Stories about the Prime Minister's press secretary, Alastair Campbell, have all the ingredients to excite. He does not appear in front of the cameras, give formal interviews or answer questions in the Commons. Yet he is extremely powerful. He is therefore...
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Suharto's Shadow-Puppet World
Indonesia's old despot will not be in London this week. But don't assume he's in trouble Even the prospect of hob-nobbing with Tony Blair has not proved sufficient to lure Asia's longest-serving leader halfway round the world this week. Given the circumstances,...
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The Arts You Own but Cannot See: The Arts Council Collection Revealed
As Tony Blair roamed around his new address last May, he spied a painting composed of matchstick people dotted across a beach. Recognising the work of L S Lowry, John Major's favourite artist, Blair decided that the painting should no longer be concealed...
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The Blair Government May Well Be Setting a New Record as New Labour's Sleaze Runs Deeper Than a Phone Call from Murdoch
The Prime Minister's new role as business informant for Rupert Murdoch highlights yet another distinction for new Labour. The Blair regime is on its way to becoming the sleaziest British government in living memory. In just 11 months it has notched up...
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Ulster's Heart-Stopping Moment
The peace talks, in theory, conclude this week and an outline agreement is visible, but can the politicians face their supporters with its implications? Some years ago, a youth club from the Irish Republic and one from the Protestant area of east Belfast...
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We Can't Wait Any Longer to Map the Digital Mediascape
Where are we heading in the multimedia revolution? It may be a familiar question, but in Britain the hardest questions about the future of broadcasting still have to be faced: will the Internet supersede all other mechanisms for delivering television?...
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When Visiting Michelin Restaurants It's Handy If You Can Tell Your Canards from Your Connards
"You'd like to take advantage of our gastronomic restaurant?" If it hadn't seemed ill-mannered to draw attention to the receptionist's uncertain English, I might have replied that nothing in the world could possibly give me greater pleasure than to take...
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Will Self
ROCK Jarvis cocks it up It's been an odd couple of years for me. Most probably it's my age, but not for a long time can I remember finding myself junking so many artistic reputations with such fervour and consistency. "Go!" - I order the hapless artists...
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