New Zealand Journal of Psychology

Publication covering psychology and mental health.

Articles from Vol. 40, No. 4, November

After the Earthquakes: Immediate Post-Disaster Work with Children and Families
Unintentional Re-traumatisation It is now well understood in the literature, but not well understood by some helping professionals and volunteers who have not lived through a disaster with multiple deaths, that some aspects of normal counselling,...
An Overview of the Canterbury District Health Board (CDHB) Mental Health Service's Response to the 2010-2011 Canterbury Earthquakes
This paper is not an academic one focusing on research relating to this disaster. Instead it will outline the response of the CDHB SMHS and the activities/roles staff have undertaken in the psychosocial response since the earthquakes began in September...
Community Engagement Post-Disaster: Case Studies of the 2006 Matata Debris Flow and 2010 Darfield Earthquake, New Zealand
Engagement is a construct that has different meanings in different contexts (Son & Lin, 2008). It is often used to describe a range of actions that take place between people and organisations. It can include a variety of approaches and styles of...
For Better or for Worse: How Initial Support Provision Adapted to Needs
I'm an Industrial / Organisational psychologist, so this is our particular perspective--from a corporate and commercial perspective in terms of the priority of services to the business part of the community. But more than that, what I really want to...
Foreword
On behalf of the New Zealand Journal of Psychology and the New Zealand Psychological Society (NZPsS), I would like to open this Supplementary Issue by acknowledging the generosity of spirit and energy of those who have worked so hard to bring this...
How Communities in Christchurch Have Been Coping with Their Earthquake
The major earthquake activity in Canterbury has included: * 7.1 measured earthquake on Saturday morning, 4:34am, September 4, 2010, now known as the Greendale Fault or the Canterbury earthquake, which was centred at Darfield (near Mt Hutt) with...
Living with Volcanic Risk: The Consequences of, and Response to, Ongoing Volcanic Ashfall from a Social Infrastructure Systems Perspective on Montserrat
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction Montserrat is a really interesting case study in the Caribbean. Volcanic activity has been going on for 15 years. It has had constant eruptions since 1995, so this is very much an environment where people are...
Long Term Support in Schools and Early Childhood Services after February 2011
Internationally there is some information on programmes and some information about delivery--usually by experts outside of the school sector or using a "train the trainer" model within communities to respond to post traumatic stress in children and...
Lubricating Civic Reconstruction: Reducing Losses Due to Interorganisational Friction
Introduction After reviewing the situation that gave rise to strained formal and other inter-organisational relationships, this paper considers three topics. The first topic, keeping interorganisational cooperation strong in the aftermath, as...
New Zealanders' Judgments of Earthquake Risk before and after the Canterbury Earthquake: Do They Relate to Preparedness?
This paper focuses on the Christchurch earthquake in relation to risk perception and preparedness. Risk assessment is not the main factor in preparedness; in fact, risk assessment is often a weak predictor of being ready or prepared, as in the case...
NZ Defence Force Response to the Christchurch Earthquake of February 2011
The NZDF applied this resiliency framework in their response to the 6.3 magnitude earthquake in Christchurch on 22 February 2011. The NZDF followed direction from the New Zealand Government under the civil defence guidelines, and deployed a Quick Reaction...
Organisational and Cultural Factors That Promote Coping: With Reference to Haiti and Christchurch
Background My professional focus for the past 20 years has been the health, safety and competence of international humanitarian emergency and development workers. I have worked in a wide variety of locations, countries, wars and natural disasters...
People, Places and Shifting Paradigms-When 'South Island' Stoicism Isn't Enough
In 2010 and 2011 the Ministry of Education responded to three significant disaster events in the space of six months, offering support to the education community. The scale of these events was unprecedented and challenged MOE Staff to develop appropriate...
Post-Earthquake Psychological Functioning in Adults with Attention-Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder: Positive Effects of Micronutrients on Resilience
On 4th September, 2010, at 4.35am local time, a 7.1 magnitude earthquake struck the Canterbury region of New Zealand (Quigley et al., 2010), with its epicentre about 40 kms from the South Island's major city, Christchurch (population ~380,000). Despite...
Principles Guiding Practice and Responses to Recent Community Disasters in New Zealand
The Events At 4.36am on 4 September, 2010, an earthquake measuring 7.1 on the Richter Scale hit Christchurch. Most people were home sleeping and families were under one roof. While there were no fatalities, there was widespread damage to buildings,...
Promoting Recovery and Building Resilience for Individuals and Communities
Introduction In March of 2011, following the two major earthquakes in Canterbury in September 2010 and February 2011, the Ministry of Social Development (MSD) invited organisations to apply to provide training to volunteers and paid employees of...
Provision of Support to Schools and Early Childhood Services after the Pike River Disaster
Why did the Ministry of Education have a role and assist the community in this instance? Following traumatic events, that potentially affect the well-being and education of children and young people, the Ministry has an expectation that disruption...
Psychosocial Recovery from Disasters: A Framework Informed by Evidence
The earthquakes in Canterbury during 2010 and 2011 have created unprecedented demands on agencies tasked with disaster recovery. An earthquake sequence of this nature and extent in Canterbury was unanticipated, and the multiple agencies involved needed...
Responding to the Psychological Consequences of Disaster: Lessons for New Zealand from the Aftermath of the Georgian-Russian Conflict in 2008
We have been involved in training, researching, and developing services for children in Georgia for 15 years and have established Children of Georgia, a non-governmental organisation (NGO) which advocates on behalf of and for orphaned and disabled...
The Communication of Uncertain Scientific Advice during Natural Hazard Events
New Zealand is a country at risk from numerous extreme natural hazards that pose a threat to life, infrastructure and business. These include explosive volcanic eruptions, earthquakes and tsunami. Emergency management of these events involves a number...
The Context in Which We Examine Disasters in New Zealand: An Editorial
This is a tale of two earthquakes (you could say many more on account of persistent aftershocks) that were, in a Dickensian way, the best of times and the worst of times. It is a tale of two cities as well. There are a lot of contrasts between the...
The Education Welfare Response Immediately Following the February 2011 Earthquake
The Education Welfare Response (EWR) (3) was a part of a larger Ministry of Education (MOE) response included a wide range of activities: working across early childhood (EC), primary, secondary and tertiary sectors: property, payroll, resourcing, leadership,...