Presidential Studies Quarterly

Presidential Studies Quarterly is a quarterly newsletter on the subject of citizenship. Presidential Studies Quarterly is written by the Center for the Study of the Presidency and published by Sage Publications, Inc., in Thousand Oaks, Calif.

Articles from Vol. 30, No. 2, June

Divided Government and Democratic Presidents: Truman and Clinton Compared
Little consensus exists about the consequences of divided partisan control of American national institutions. Many scholars argue that with opposite parties controlling the presidency and Congress, the incentive for executive-legislative cooperation...
Fiscal Policy and Presidential Elections: Update and Extension
According to two articles previously published in this journal, fiscal policy exerts a predictable effect on the outcome of presidential elections in the United States (Cuzan and Heggen 1984; Cuzan and Bundrick 1992). It appears that, independent of...
Lincoln, Machiavelli, and American Political Thought
Machiavelli offers crucial theoretical insights into the American presidency, as some of our leading scholars of the presidency have both implicitly and explicitly demonstrated. James MacGregor Burns (1956), for instance, drew on Machiavelli for both...
Source Material: The White House Interview Program: Objectives, Resources, Releases
"The White House is not simply a spoil of victory," observed Harrison Wellford, a former White House official and specialist on presidential transitions,(1) "it's the nerve center of the greatest government in the world and we ought to at least give...
The Forgotten Legacy of the New Deal: Fiscal Conservatism and the Roosevelt Administration, 1933-1938
When President William Clinton elevated deficit reduction to the top of his domestic agenda in 1993, he tapped into a long-standing Democratic tradition that was rooted in the 1930s. Liberalism and fiscal conservatism have been interwoven since the...
The Law: The Clinton Impeachment: Untangling the Web of Conflicting Considerations
The process of impeaching and removing a president is an insurance policy that was bequeathed to us by the Constitution's framers--in the hope that we would rarely have to use it. In the mere two attempts to date that reached a Senate trial, the only...
Theodore Roosevelt, Congress, and the Military: U.S. Civil-Military Relations in the Early Twentieth Century
"Someone should kick ... Rosevelt [sic]," complained one naval officer about the assistant secretary of the navy in 1898 (Davis 1898). Hunter Davis disliked Theodore Roosevelt's efforts to end the squabbling over status between the navy's line and...
The Polls: Public Attitudes toward the First Lady
The institutionalization of the presidency suggests that we need to view the presidency as a collective enterprise and not only from the perspective of the person in office. Among the many consequences of institutionalization of the office has been...
The President as Opposition Leader
The Idea of Opposition Leadership In his masterpiece The Discourses, Machiavelli (1940) argues that, in addition to good fortune, the political leader needs for his "modes of procedure" to accord with the "needs of the times" (pp. 92-94). Presidents...