Presidential Studies Quarterly

Presidential Studies Quarterly is a quarterly newsletter on the subject of citizenship. Presidential Studies Quarterly is written by the Center for the Study of the Presidency and published by Sage Publications, Inc., in Thousand Oaks, Calif.

Articles from Vol. 31, No. 1, March

Causes of Change in National Security Processes: Carter, Reagan, and Bush Decision Making on Arms Control
The structure of national security decision making at the presidential level is one of the most crucial, yet often neglected, aspects of the study of the presidency. Since the 1980s, neorealist and neoliberal theories that focus on system-level causes...
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Lessons from Past Presidential Transitions: Organization, Management, and Decision Making
Beginning with the Carter effort in 1976, the four transitions that have occurred to date share common elements: * transition planning activities undertaken before the November election, * organization of a postelection transition, * creation...
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Reform as Affirmation: Jimmy Carter's Executive Branch Reorganization Effort
The paradox of the modern presidency is that while each administration is an idiosyncratic product of personality, context, and group dynamics, presidents tend to behave and perform in similar ways. Scholars' tendency to concentrate on the similarities...
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Source Material: Presidents and Polling: Politicians, Pandering, and the Study of Democratic Responsiveness
In our recent book, Politicians Don't Pander: Political Manipulation and the Loss of Democratic Responsiveness (Jacobs and Shapiro 2000), we assert that there has been a decline in democratic responsiveness at the very top of American national govemment....
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The Contemporary Presidency: The Presidential "Hundred Days": An Overview
The "Hundred Days" of 1933, a term the American media had borrowed from French history, was used to denote Franklin D. Roosevelt's great success with Congress in and after that year's banking crisis. Ever since, the term has been used analogically...
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The Law: Presidential Memoranda and Executive Orders: Of Patchwork Quilts, Trump Cards, and Shell Games
Two days after William Jefferson Clinton took office on January 20, 1993, he issued significant policy changes in several controversial areas. He did so not by introducing legislation or even by issuing executive orders but by promulgating presidential...
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The New World Order in Theory and Practice: The Bush Administration's Worldview in Transition
The new world order is a concept that emerged prominently three times in the twentieth century. Woodrow Wilson sought to create a new world order after World War I only to find that the world, as well as the U.S. Senate, was not ready for his brand...
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The Polls: Popular Views of the Vice President: Vice Presidential Approval
The vice president serves under the shadow of the president. The major rationale for the office is to provide for succession to the presidency in the case of the death or incapacity of the incumbent president. Other than presiding over the Senate and...
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The Presidency and the Political Environment
An effective White House staff, Howard Baker tells us, is an extension of the president. Drawing on their own experience, other White House veterans explain why. Richard Cheney sees a good White House staff as absolutely essential to a president's...
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The White House as City Hall: A Tough Place to Organize
When you enter your West Wing office for the first time, you are going to know right off you are in a world different from any you have experienced. "When you walk into the White House at the beginning of an administration, it is empty," commented...
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