Presidential Studies Quarterly

Presidential Studies Quarterly is a quarterly newsletter on the subject of citizenship. Presidential Studies Quarterly is written by the Center for the Study of the Presidency and published by Sage Publications, Inc., in Thousand Oaks, Calif.

Articles from Vol. 30, No. 4, December

After the Missiles of October: John F. Kennedy and Cuba, November 1962 to November 1963
In analyzing U.S. relations with Cuba during the Kennedy administration, scholars have understandably focused on dramatic events and policies--the Bay of Pigs invasion, the U.S. campaign of terrorism and sabotage known as Operation Mongoose, the assassination...
Bush Presidential Library Grants
The Peter and Edith O'Donnell Endowment in the George Bush Presidential Library Foundation provides grants to aid scholars doing research at the George Bush Presidential Library. Research must include, but not be limited to, holdings of the George...
Do Primary Voters Draw from a Stacked Deck? Presidential Nominations in an Era of Candidate-Centered Campaigns
Most observers of presidential nominations contend that the McGovern-Fraser Committee and other reforms of the early 1970s made the nomination process more democratic and open (Ranney 1975, 1977; Kirkpatrick 1978; Ceaser 1982; Polsby 1983; Lengle 1981;...
Drafting Lyndon Johnson: The President's Secret Role in the 1968 Democratic Convention
This article argues that contrary to perceived wisdom, President Lyndon Johnson wanted to be drafted by the 1968 Democratic convention. Johnson and his aides covertly planned all aspects of the convention, from the amount of space allotted to each...
Gauging Public Opinion in the Hoover White House: Understanding the Roots of Presidential Polling
Ours is a government by opinion, and the press is a most important part of that process. --Herbert Hoover Analyses of presidential polling during the Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon administrations (Sudman 1982; Jacobs 1992, 1993; Jacobs and Shapiro...
Public Opinion and the Contradictions of Jimmy Carter's Foreign Policy
One of President Jimmy Carter's more memorable promises was to conduct a foreign policy "that the American people both support ... and know about and understand" (Carter 1977, 955). Ironically, Carter's foreign policy was neither supported nor understood...
Source Material: Controversy: The Kennedy Tapes: Past and Future
We are glad to reply to the concerns Sheldon M. Stem (2000) and Terry Sullivan (2000) have expressed in Presidential Studies Quarterly about The Kennedy Tapes: Inside the White House during the Cuban Missile Crisis. They axe quite right to be attentive...
The Contemporary Presidency: Meeting the Freight Train Head On: Planning for the Transition to Power
Presidential candidates must plan now for how the winner and his staff will make effective use of his early days in office, according to present and former White House staff members interviewed for the White House Interview Program. The program is...
The Law: Controversy: Demise of the War Clause
Adler (2000), in his trenchant attack in this journal on President Bill Clinton's use of the military power of the United States, vigorously restates the academic orthodoxy with regard to the war power. Clinton, it is argued, is the latest in a succession...
The Polls: Polling for a Defense: The White House Public Opinion Apparatus and the Clinton Impeachment
The scandal surrounding President Bill Clinton and his subsequent impeachment and trial affords scholars a multitude of stories to tell--from abuses of executive privilege to partisanship run amok. One of the more interesting stories of the events...
U.S. Presidents and the Use of Economic Sanctions
With the end of the cold war, states have begun using economic sanctions with much greater frequency. Increased economic ties leading to a greater ability to impose economic sanctions, the end of the Security Council gridlock, and the desire to rely...
Virtues of the War Clause
In his critique of my 2000 article "The Clinton Theory of the War Power" and themes prominent in some of my work on the Constitution and U.S. foreign policy, David Mervin (2000 [this issue]) concedes that my reading of the framers' intentions is "broadly...