Presidential Studies Quarterly

Presidential Studies Quarterly is a quarterly newsletter on the subject of citizenship. Presidential Studies Quarterly is written by the Center for the Study of the Presidency and published by Sage Publications, Inc., in Thousand Oaks, Calif.

Articles from Vol. 34, No. 1, March

Did President Bush Mislead the Country in His Arguments for War with Iraq?
President Bush has been accused by some in the popular press of lying in his arguments for taking the United States to war with Iraq in 2003. But in order to make judgments about the accuracy of the president's statements, the claims must be analyzed...
Elections: Personal Popularity in U.S. Presidential Elections
As Election Day 2004 approaches, there will undoubtedly be a lot of talk concerning which major party candidate is most personally appealing. A commonly held view is that presidential elections are largely personality contests, and that the candidate...
Franklin D. Roosevelt and World War II
"Roosevelt 'had said that he would wage war, but not declare it, and that he would become more and more provocative.'" So reported British Prime Minister Winston Churchill to his cabinet upon his return to London in August 1941, following his first...
From the Editor
On October 31, 2003, the nation lost its preeminent student of the American presidency when Richard Elliott Neustadt died at the age of 84. A giant in the field of American politics and a loyal friend, a selfless colleague, and an irreplaceable intellectual...
George Bush and the Gulf War of 1991
"This Will Not Stand" The Gulf War of 1991 grew out of a pair of miscalculations. American officials underestimated the depth of Iraqi grievance against Kuwait at the end of the Iran-Iraq war of 1980-1988, including the willingness of Iraqi president...
Introduction
This special issue was conceived in the autumn of 2002, at a time when the administration of George W. Bush appeared to be moving toward war against Iraq. Presidential Studies Quarterly editor George Edwards and I decided that there might be value...
Lyndon Johnson and Vietnam
In 1965, the United States under Lyndon B. Johnson entered large-scale war in Vietnam. It did so incrementally, over a period of several months in the first half of the year. The contingency planning for war, however, went back considerably further....
McKinley and the Spanish-American War
This article describes and analyzes President William McKinley's foreign and domestic policies that led to the Spanish-American War of 1898. On the domestic side it includes congressional partisan politics, economic and business concerns, religious...
Richard Elliott Neustadt, 1919-2003: A Tribute
Richard Elliott Neustadt was an academic who throughout his lifetime combined politics and practice in his area of American politics in a unique manner benefiting the academic and governmental institutions in which he worked. Neustadt died October...
Richard E. Neustadt as Teacher and Mentor: A Personal Reflection
I first encountered Dick Neustadt when I walked into his graduate class on the presidency at Columbia University in the fall of 1962. A small but intense man, at least as judged by his chain smoking, he conducted a rather large class in a very informal...
Richard E. Neustadt's Intellectual Contributions
Richard Neustadt made many contributions to the study of the presidency during his distinguished and prolific career. He began his own observations through total immersion in the institution itself. From 1946 until 1953, he worked first for the Bureau...
The Contemporary Presidency: George W. Bush and the Myth of Heroic Presidential Leadership
On September 11, 2001, the lead story on the CNN early morning news centered on speculation that Michael Jordan was planning to come out of retirement and resume playing basketball. The story preoccupied the American media; after all, three years previously,...
The Law: Termination of the ABM Treaty and the Political Question Doctrine: Judicial Succor for Presidential Power
President George W. Bush's unilateral termination of the 1972 ABM Treaty between the United States and Russia, (1) an act overshadowed by the trauma, chaos, and confusion that gripped the nation in the weeks and months following the September 11 outrage,...
Woodrow Wilson and World War I
On February 4, 1915, the Imperial German government announced the establishment of a war zone in the waters surrounding the British Isles. (1) In that zone, German submarines would sink Allied ships on sight, and because the Allies frequently used...