Presidential Studies Quarterly

Presidential Studies Quarterly is a quarterly newsletter on the subject of citizenship. Presidential Studies Quarterly is written by the Center for the Study of the Presidency and published by Sage Publications, Inc., in Thousand Oaks, Calif.

Articles from Vol. 34, No. 3, September

Elections: The American Process of Selecting a President: A Comparative Perspective
The United States has fallen well behind worldwide trends in presidential elections. Its electoral college regionalizes the contest for the national executive, contrary to a worldwide trend toward direct election. U.S. states continue to select presidential...
If the News Is So Bad, Why Are Presidential Polls So High? Presidents, the News Media, and the Mass Public in an Era of New Media
By almost any standard, 1998 was a horrible year for any president. Bill Clinton's affair with Monica Lewinsky became public, leading to his impeachment. The Republican-controlled Congress heartily attacked him, and the news media, never easy on the...
Presidential Rhetoric and Economic Leadership
The two most important areas of leadership for any president are the economy and foreign policy. Presidential leadership in these two areas is mutually dependent, because foreign policy actions can affect U.S. macroeconomic performance (Wood and Durham...
Presidential Rhetoric and the Power of Definition
Presidential rhetoric is studied from the perspectives of both the social sciences and the humanities. From a humanistic perspective, scholars are concerned with the uniqueness of exemplary cases as well as with recurrent patterns, and they seek insight...
Source Material: New Presidents and Network News: Covering the First Year in Office of Ronald Reagan, Bill Clinton, and George W. Bush
Introduction New presidents and their executive branch teams endeavor to make a good first impression. To that end, incoming presidential administrations carefully organize their public affairs staff, select issues they wish to emphasize, and try...
The Changing Presidential Media Environment
If the power of the presidency is the power to persuade, then the ability to communicate with the American public is one key tool in exercising that power. When presidents speak to the nation they expect to garner a large viewing audience, and for...
The Contemporary Presidency: The Presidency and Image Management: Discipline in Pursuit of Illusion
"Presidential government is an illusion.... " Heclo and Salamon (1981, 1). A triumphant president lands in a jet on an aircraft carrier, to celebrate with loyal troops a stunning victory over a tyrannical despot. The sailors greet him with boisterous...
The Law: Recess Appointments to Article III Courts
On January 16, 2004, during the recess between the first and second sessions of the 108th Congress, President George W. Bush appointed Charles W. Pickering to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit. On February 20, three days before the Senate...
The Public Presidency, Personal Approval Ratings, and Policy Making
In this article, I argue that personal popularity is less essential to how a president's public activities affect policy making than commonly presumed, and provide two types of evidence for this argument. First, I show that unpopular as well as popular...
The Second Face of the Public Presidency: Presidential Polling and the Shift from Policy to Personality Polling
Research on the public presidency has focused on the direct and often unmediated appeals that modern presidents make to the general public. Presidents have been portrayed as first among the talking heads--"going public" over the heads of members of...
Verbal Certainty in American Politics: An Overview and Extension
One of the most important questions about political leadership is also one of the oldest: How strong must a leader be? For many, the answer is simple: A leader must be the strongest person on the block, able to conquer all rivals. But a moment's reflection...