Presidential Studies Quarterly

Presidential Studies Quarterly is a quarterly newsletter on the subject of citizenship. Presidential Studies Quarterly is written by the Center for the Study of the Presidency and published by Sage Publications, Inc., in Thousand Oaks, Calif.

Articles from Vol. 27, No. 3, Summer

After Tiananmen: The Struggle over U.S. Policy toward China in the Bush Administration
The end of the Cold War alters the making of U.S.. foreign policy along two routes. Most directly, the Cold War's conclusion shifts the character of the international environment at which U.S. foreign policy is targeted, including the distribution...
Containing the Offensive: The "Chief of the Cold War" and the Eisenhower Administration's German Policy
As you and your associates gather to discuss ways to improve our penetration of the Iron Curtain, I give full endorsement to your efforts. I learned the importance of truth as a weapon in the midst of battle. I am sure that to win the peace, we must...
From START to START II: Dynamism and Pragmatism in the Bush Administration's Nuclear Weapon Policies
During the fall of 1989, the Cold War that had waged between East and West for more than four long decades came to a rapid halt. Communism, which had consumed and shaped the thinking of most American policy makers during this time, was rapidly retreating...
F.W. De Klerk and Nelson Mandela: A Study in Cooperative Transformational Leadership
This study examines the transfer of power in South Africa, focusing on the interactions of leadership policies, strategies, and personal characteristics of F. W. de Klerk and Nelson Mandela. The revolution that these men have helped bring about through...
"In an Atmosphere of National Peril": The Development of John F. Kennedy's World View
It is customarily recognized that President John F. Kennedy was more interested in foreign than domestic policy,(1) determined to be practical instead of idealistic,(2) and, as some scholars have suggested, displayed weaknesses in character.(3) As...
Lincoln and the Political Question: The Creation of the State of West Virginia
West Virginia is a child of the Civil War--a state made possible by the extraordinary chaos and opportunities that such upheavals bring. For the war generation and for those interested ever since, that episode created confusing constitutional debates...
Presidential Beliefs and the Reagan Paradox
On December 8, 1987, President Reagan and General Secretary Gorbachev signed the Intermediate Nuclear Forces (INF) treaty in Washington, D.C. The treaty was followed seven months later by the sight of a friendly Reagan and Gorbachev strolling across...
Public Opinion and Foreign Policy: The Nixon Administration and the Pursuit of Peace with Honor in Vietnam
Long after the Communist takeover, American academics still battle over how and why the United States lost the Vietnam War.(1) Adherents of the conventional" school maintain that U.S. policy makers mistakenly imposed a global conception of communism...
Rating the Presidents: A Tracking Study
Between 1982 and 1994, the Siena Research Institute completed and released three Presidential Ratings Studies. Each was administered approximately one year after the inauguration of a new president. For the first of the three presidents, Ronald Reagan,...
Ronald Reagan and the Defeat of the Soviet Empire
American policy in the 1980s was a catalyst for the collapse of the Soviet Union. Former KGB General Oleg Kalugin(1) In 1980, the Soviet Union threatened the survival of the United States, her allies, and the very principle of self-government....
The First Lady Represents America: Rosalynn Carter in South America
Representation and accountability are two crucial elements in our democratic system. An elected official both stands for the constituency group and acts for the people represented. Presidents must assume both the passive and active role of representative...