Presidential Studies Quarterly

Presidential Studies Quarterly is a quarterly newsletter on the subject of citizenship. Presidential Studies Quarterly is written by the Center for the Study of the Presidency and published by Sage Publications, Inc., in Thousand Oaks, Calif.

Articles from Vol. 28, No. 2, Spring

Comparing Presidents Reagan and Eisenhower
Many scholars--such as Richard E. Neustadt and Stephen Skowronek,(1) among others--have made notable analogies between presidents Ronald Reagan and Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Indeed, the similarities are tantalizing. But one similarly appealing analogy...
Executive Privilege in the Ford Administration: Prudence in the Exercise of Presidential Power
The Watergate crisis brought the doctrine of executive privilege--which recognizes the right of the president to withhold information from the coordinate branches of government--to the forefront of political discourse in the United States. Although...
Herbert Hoover and the Presidential Campaign of 1932: The Failure of Apologia
Despite Franklin D. Roosevelt's landslide victory, few elections have held more lasting significance for political scientists, historians, and communication scholars than the presidential election of 1932. Never before had one issue--the Great Depression--so...
Jefferson's Madison vs. Jefferson's Monroe
The so-called Virginia Dynasty of 1801 to 1825--the successive presidencies of Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and James Monroe--is generally portrayed as the period of America's republicanization. In 1819, a decade into retirement when he was thinking...
Justice Byron White and Separation of Powers
The first three articles of the Constitution describe a structure that both separates and intermingles the duties of government. The tension between these two elements of the design creates a fertile ground for conflict, particularly when any of the...
Modern Presidential Transitions: Problems, Pitfalls, and Lessons for Success
In the first year of the Clinton administration, President Clinton's White House staff was engaged in a heated discussion of the administration's economic stimulus package and its plight in the Congress. While some White House staffers urged moderation...
Predicting the Outcomes of Presidential Commissions: Evidence from the Johnson and Nixon Years
The problem started when the initial decisions were made to hand the process to one expert named Ira Magaziner, who knew, number one, nothing about politics, and number two, nothing about healthcare.(1) Representative Jim McDermott (D-WA), on the failure...
Richard Nixon's Political Hinterland: The Shadows of JFK Adn Charles De Gaulle
Each president enters the White House to be confronted by the reputations of those who already have held the office. It is commonplace to ask the new incumbent which predecessors are to be admired. For Richard Nixon, the presidents included among...
The President as Disciplinarian: Wilson, Roosevelt, and Congressional Primaries
The role of party leader ranks high in every standard listing of presidential responsibilities. Yet, as analysts ranging from E. E. Schattschneider(1) to James MacGregor BUMS(2) have demonstrated, in a political system built on a foundation of competing...
Woodrow Wilson and Administrative Reform
Over a long academic and political career Woodrow Wilson struggled with the question of how to achieve vigorous leadership and effective administration in a democracy. As a theoretician, he proposed a dramatic expansion of administrative powers and...