Presidential Studies Quarterly

Presidential Studies Quarterly is a quarterly newsletter on the subject of citizenship. Presidential Studies Quarterly is written by the Center for the Study of the Presidency and published by Sage Publications, Inc., in Thousand Oaks, Calif.

Articles from Vol. 33, No. 4, December

American Values or Human Rights? U.S. Foreign Policy and the Fractured Myth of Virtuous Power
May 2002 brought the odd spectacle of ex-President Jimmy Carter standing shoulder to shoulder in Havana with one of the U.S. government's oldest enemies, Cuban president Fidel Castro. Carter, on a mission to convey a message of friendship to the Cuban...
Elections: Was the 2000 Presidential Election Fair? an Analysis of Comparative and Retrospective Survey Data
Americans have long taken great pride in their presidential elections. With a proud history extending back over 200 years, the selection of a U.S. president has long been held up to emerging democracies as an example to be emulated. Power has been...
George Bush and the 102d Congress: The Impact of Public and "Private" Veto Threats on Policy Outcomes
Introduction Changing institutional and electoral dynamics in Congress in the last several decades have placed greater limitations on presidents' ability to influence roll call outcomes. Presidents' floor success rates have been a casualty of the...
Presidential Renomination Challenges in the 20th Century
One of the common generalizations about presidential elections is that incumbents win their political party's nomination if they seek it (David et al. 1960, 67; Keech and Matthews 1976, ch. 2; Epstein 1978, 178; Abramson et al. 1987). Though renomination...
Source Material: Out of Office and in the News: Early Projections of the Clinton Legacy
The news media play a significant role in communicating relevant information about a president's tenure, not only to the public, but also to those directly involved in creating a president's legacy (particularly scholars and elite journalists). A recent...
The Bush Presidency and the American Electorate
Introduction George W. Bush entered the White House with the electorate evenly divided between the parties and sharply polarized along party lines, not least on the legitimacy of his victory. After the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, Americans...
The Contemporary Presidency: The Twenty-Fifth Amendment: Recommendations and Deliberations of the Working Group on Presidential Disability
The Framers of the Constitution addressed the issues of presidential disability and succession in the document they wrote in Philadelphia in 1787 but they did so in ambiguous and uncertain language. Article II, section 5, states that "In case of the...
The Law: Congressional Access to Presidential Documents: The House Resolution of Inquiry
Congress has many techniques for obtaining documents from the executive branch, including simple requests, committee investigations, subpoenas, and holding executive officials in contempt. One procedure, used only in the House of Representatives, is...
The Polls: Presidential Greatness as Seen in the Mass Public: An Extension and Application of the Simonton Model
Introduction While presidential greatness rankings may not objectively inform us about who the best presidents are, they do tell us much about the factors that raters employ when comparing presidents. To date, most attention has focused on expert...
Was Reagan Really a Great Communicator? the Influence of Televised Addresses on Public Opinion
Theodore Roosevelt captured the nation's imagination with his use of the bully pulpit to go over the heads of the Washington elite to speak directly to the people. Since that time, spurred on by generations of textbooks and political punditry proclaiming...
What Presidents Talk About: The Nixon Case
Why do presidents talk at length about some policy issues, while ignoring others? Which issues do presidents emphasize in their public rhetoric, how do they talk about them, why, and with what effects? How do they divide their messages between oral...
"Who Ever Believed in the 'Missile Gap?": John F. Kennedy and the Politics of National Security
In a meeting on December 5, 1962, President John F. Kennedy and his senior military advisers met to discuss the proposed budget for the Department of Defense for fiscal year 1964. Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara, anticipating criticisms of the...