Presidential Studies Quarterly

Presidential Studies Quarterly is a quarterly newsletter on the subject of citizenship. Presidential Studies Quarterly is written by the Center for the Study of the Presidency and published by Sage Publications, Inc., in Thousand Oaks, Calif.

Articles from Vol. 28, No. 1, Winter

A Short Note on the Expenditures of the McKinley Campaign of 1896
While the presidencies of William McKinley and William Jefferson Clinton seem to have little in common, both may be remembered in the long run for the controversy over expenditures in their respective campaigns. Given that over 100 years have passed...
Congressional Relations and "Public Relations": In the Administration of Rutherford B. Hayes
There has been relatively little research into efforts by nineteenth-century presidents to influence the legislative process. Yet, while institutionalized procedures and specialized staffs devoted to congressional liaison only emerged in the twentieth...
Congress, the President, and the Use of Military Force: Cooperation or Conflict in the Post-Cold War Era?
The separation of powers regarding the use of the military force is one of the most widely disputed issues in the constitutional law of U.S. foreign policy. Many scholars have debated this question from a legal perspective, arguing whether the president...
First-Term Presidents and Their Party's House Freshmen: Crafting a Strategic Alliance
Scholars have long maintained an interest in how presidents structure and push their policy agendas to get what they want from Capitol Hill and to enhance their own standing and that of their party. This article adds a modifier to the way we think...
Foreign Policy for Sale? Interest Group Influence on President Clinton's Cuba Policy, August 1994
"Anything the Foundation wants, it gets."(1) Aide to Representative Robert Torricelli At 1:30 P.M. on a Friday afternoon (August 19, 1994), President Clinton held a White House Press Conference and reversed the U.S. policy of accepting...
In Reagan's Shadow: Bush's Antirhetorical Presidency
George Bush became president after perhaps the most public relations-driven presidency in history. President Ronald Reagan's command of the media was masterly and it created very high expectations for his immediate successor. For Bush, the trouble...
Presidential Influence on Independent Commissions: A Case of FTC Staffing Levels
Independent regulatory commissions are intended to be autonomous and removed from direct outside control. They are not truly independent, however. The literature suggests that their regulatory policies and performances are affected by the legislative...
Presidential Leadership or Structural Constraints? the Failure of President Carter's Health Insurance Proposals
This study explores presidential leadership in domestic policy by assessing how Jimmy Carter, working with a Democratic majority in Congress, dealt with health care reform. This article will explore how the personal style, organizational arrangements,...
Struggles of the First "New Democrat": Jimmy Carter, Youth Employment Policy, and the Great Society Legacy
The reevaluation of the Carter presidency has hit its stride. The critical interpretation of contemporary writers has been largely replaced With a more sympathetic understanding of the difficulties any American president would have faced in the late...
The Politics and Poetry of Advice and Consent: Congress Confronts the Roosevelt Administration during the State Department Confirmation Incident of 1944
An old saying claims that politics makes for strange bedfellows. President Franklin D. Roosevelt, and for that matter most informed Americans, believed that when a slate of nominees for subcabinet positions in the State Department became front-page...
Two Types of Presidential Influence in Congress
How does the president influence Congress? Richard E. Neustadt's classic work, Presidential Power, describes that power as "the power to persuade."(1) This article examines how the president exercises this power within the legislative process, as...
When the Relationship Went Sour: Syria and the Eisenhower Administration
In the summer of 1919, Henry Churchill King, president of Oberlin College, and Chicago businessman and Democratic Party activist Charles R. Crane--that is, the King-Crane Commission--traveled to Syria, Lebanon, Anatolia, and Palestine to meet with...