Presidential Studies Quarterly

Presidential Studies Quarterly is a quarterly newsletter on the subject of citizenship. Presidential Studies Quarterly is written by the Center for the Study of the Presidency and published by Sage Publications, Inc., in Thousand Oaks, Calif.

Articles from Vol. 41, No. 3, September

Assessing Congressional Responses to Growing Presidential Powers: The Case of Recess Appointments
In 2007, President George W. Bush indicated that he planned to fill vacancies on several key independent boards and commissions by using his presidential recess appointment power. Anyone receiving such an appointment could serve for up to two years...
Editors' Introduction
As guest editors of this special issue of Presidential Studies Quarterly, we were charged with soliciting papers that would showcase the current state of scholarship on presidential-congressional relations. In our call, we asked for theoretically grounded,...
Going Public When Opinion Is Contested: Evidence from Presidents' Campaigns for Supreme Court Nominees, 1930-2009
"Going public" is an important weapon for presidents as they seek legislative victories in Congress (Kernell 1986). Indeed, some have called it the core governing strategy of modern presidents (Edwards 2003). Not surprisingly, studies of going public...
Opportunism in Polarization: Presidential Success in Senate Key Votes, 1953-2008
That the last half-century has seen increased polarization in Washington is clear. Holders of most key posts and key votes just a few decades back, conservative Democrats and liberal Republicans are now few and far between, so much so that one scribe...
Political Theater or Bargaining Failure: Why Presidents Veto
Until recently there has been little scholarly consideration of why presidential vetoes occur, perhaps because the answer seemed obvious. Vetoes occur, one might reasonably conclude, because Congress passes bills the president does not want to become...
Polls and Elections: Firing Back: Out-Party Responses to Presidential State of the Union Addresses, 1966-2006
The U.S. Constitution requires American presidents to deliver regular updates about the "State of the Union" to Congress. Article II, Section 3, stipulates that the president, "shall from time to time give to the Congress information about the State...
Power or Posturing? Policy Availability and Congressional Influence on U.S. Presidential Decisions to Use Force
With the passage of the Iraq War resolution in October 2002, Congress delegated immense authority to President George W. Bush, the likes of which had not been seen since 1964 when President Lyndon Johnson was granted wide discretion in Vietnam. The...
Presidents, Polarization, and Divided Government
For several decades the American political system has been polarizing along partisan, ideological, and issue lines at both the mass and elite levels. One implication of polarization is the disappearance of the political middle: Moderates have almost...
The Contemporary Presidency: The Return of the Honeymoon: Television News Coverage of New Presidents, 1981-2009
Barack Obama's 2008 election was an emotional moment for many Americans, generating joyful rallies in many U.S. cities. The enthusiastic election night response in 2008 had more in common with the vigorous and highly partisan nineteenth-century political...
The Harbinger of the Unitary Executive? an Analysis of Presidential Signing Statements from Truman to Carter
In the 19th and early 20th centuries, presidents only infrequently commented on congressional bills when they signed them into law. Most proclamations that are now considered "signing statements" in the modern era were congratulatory. Anecdotal evidence...
The Law: Barack Obama and Budget Deficits: Signs of a Neo-Whig Presidency?
You know, the President is elected to lead. --Speaker John Boehner (R-OH, Epstein 2011) ... we're still waiting for the president to lead. --Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY, Calmes 201 la) [Obama's FY 2012 budget proposal]...