Presidential Studies Quarterly

Presidential Studies Quarterly is a quarterly newsletter on the subject of citizenship. Presidential Studies Quarterly is written by the Center for the Study of the Presidency and published by Sage Publications, Inc., in Thousand Oaks, Calif.

Articles from Vol. 37, No. 4, December

"A Discovered Dissembler Can Achieve Nothing Great"; or, Four Theses on the Death of Presidential Rhetoric in an Age of Empire
Writing in 1757 as the advice-spewing, joke-flinging, humble yet wise Poor Richard, Benjamin Franklin warned his readers that lying was an efficient route to ruining one's career. "Since no man can engage the active Assistance of others without first...
Bushspeak and the Politics of Lying: Presidential Rhetoric in the "War on Terror"
The September 11, 2001, terror attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon were a great shock to the American people and a global media spectacle that captured the attention of the world. Osama bin Laden and various groups denominated "Al Qaeda"...
Dangerous Supplements, Inventive Dissent, and Military Critiques of the Bush Administration's Unitary Executive Theories
Our strength as a nation will continue to be challenged by those who employ a strategy of the weak, using international fora, judicial process, and terrorism. (Department of Defense 2005, 5) [T]he invasion of Iraq [was] an unnecessary war.......
Elections: The Politics of the Permanent Campaign: Presidential Travel and the Electoral College, 1977-2004
Bill Clinton made headlines on December 8, 2000, when, with a mere six weeks remaining in his second presidential term, he set foot on Nebraskan soil for the first time in his presidency. With this trip, he had at long last visited all of the fifty...
George Bush, <Human Rights>, and American Democracy
Disaster is always interesting to scholars, not least because serious mistakes always demand explanation and, if nothing else, research can lay some claims to being able to provide such explanations. Indeed, the troubled history of the American military...
Hunting the Devil: Democracy's Rhetorical Impulse to War
America's chronic impulse to war is provoked by democracy's shadow, which lurks at the far reaches of the nation's political soul. Democracy casts a dark veil of anxiety over the public disposition--so much so that it constitutes a national phobia....
Shadows of Democracy in Presidential Rhetoric: An Introduction to the Special Issue
This special issue of Presidential Studies Quarterly adopts a rhetorical perspective to focus attention on the presidency as it operates in the hyper-symbolic political milieu that is contemporary public culture. It asks us to consider the question...
The Contemporary Presidency: The Carter White House Communications Operation: Lessons for His Successors
President Jimmy Carter had the most ambitious communications program of any modern president. The quality of government policy depends on the involvement of the public in its outcome, Carter believed. Early in his presidency, he explained he would...
The Law: Contextualizing the Signing Statement
In June 2007, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) released a report that described an apparent connection between the constitutional challenges in the Bush presidential signing statements and the implementation among executive branch agencies...
"The Means to Match Their Hatred": Nuclear Weapons, Rhetorical Democracy, and Presidential Discourse
In the summer of 1987, the American poet Donald Hall published a poem in the Paris Review. Entitled "Prophecy," Hall offered in this work a grimly lyrical vision of the nuclear apocalypse. Hall's poem expressed an ache that had been steadily building...