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Presidential Studies Quarterly

Presidential Studies Quarterly is a quarterly newsletter on the subject of citizenship. Presidential Studies Quarterly is written by the Center for the Study of the Presidency and published by Sage Publications, Inc., in Thousand Oaks, Calif.

Articles from Vol. 38, No. 4, December

Conveying Presidential News: The White House Press Corps Covers the President
No matter who is president or who is doing the reporting, there is continuity in the press coverage a president receives and the news organizations with whom he regularly meets. When a new president occupies the Oval Office on January 20, 2009, he...
George Akerson's Legacy: Continuity and Change in White House Press Operations
"Organization cannot make a genius out of an incompetent. On the other hand, disorganization can scarcely fail to result in inefficiency." Dwight Eisenhower (quoted in Walcott and Hult, 1995, 24) "Throw the organizational charts out. It's relationships...
Lessons Learned the Hard Way: Questioning Presidents
On February 7, 2001, as the new Bush White House settled into a rhythm, a handful of reporters from various news organizations secured some time to interview Larry Lindsey, the president's top economic advisor, who had also advised George W. Bush during...
Memorandum to the President-Elect
November 5, 2008 You mentioned that you would like some thoughts on how to bring a fresh approach to the traditionally adversarial relationship between the White House and the press corps that covers it. Here goes. As you know, nothing can short-circuit...
Polls and Elections: Editorial Cartoons 2.0: The Effects of Digital Political Satire on Presidential Candidate Evaluations
On December 12, 2005, the Association of American Editorial Cartoonists held a protest they referred to as "Black Ink Monday" in response to the cut of the editorial cartoon staff at the Los Angeles Times and the Baltimore Sun by the Tribune Company...
Presidential Communication in the Internet Era
The advent of the Internet has given rise to a challenging new era in presidential communication. Digital technology has had profound implications for the ways in which the White House deals with citizens, elites, journalists, and global actors. The...
Presidential Press Relations
When a new president is inaugurated on January 20, 2009, he will come face to face with the importance of his relationship with news organizations and the opportunities and hazards the association presents him. A president needs news organizations...
The Contemporary Presidency: "An Excess of Refinement": Lame Duck Presidents in Constitutional and Historical Context
Well into President George W. Bush's second term, history appears to be repeating itself--second terms are far more problematic than first terms. Are problematic second terms inevitable, and if so are they caused by the Twenty-second Amendment? In...
The Law: Presidential Misuse of the Pardon Power
The purpose of this article is to explore why the presidential pardon power has been invoked by our last three presidents not merely for the traditional reasons of showing mercy or ensuring justice, but also in circumstances where the president may...
The Mixed Legacies of Ronald Reagan
Although academia continues to debate Ronald Reagan's place in history, a Reagan legacy industry has been working, with some success, to enshrine the former president's memory in a host of public sites and symbols (Bjerre-Poulsen 2008). The man who...
The Presidency and Local Media: Local Newspaper Coverage of President George W. Bush
Leading the media, public, and Congress through speeches is at the core of modern presidential governance. But just as the modern political environment requires presidents to appeal for support through speeches, presidents are increasingly unable to...
Who Speaks for the People? the President, the Press, and Public Opinion in the United States
The U.S. president, the press (or media), and public opinion survey data are all stand-ins--substitutes--for the American people. In the United States as a federal republic, the U.S. president is the sole elected representative of all Americans. Among...
Who's the Fairest of Them All? an Empirical Test for Partisan Bias on ABC, CBS, NBC, and Fox News
"We [Democrats] stayed off FOX for a long time because your news department is, in fact, biased ... there are some things in the news department that have really been shockingly biased, and I think that's wrong. And I'll just say so right up front."...