Presidential Studies Quarterly

Presidential Studies Quarterly is a quarterly newsletter on the subject of citizenship. Presidential Studies Quarterly is written by the Center for the Study of the Presidency and published by Sage Publications, Inc., in Thousand Oaks, Calif.

Articles from Vol. 39, No. 1, March

Administrative Politics and the Public Presidency
President George W. Bush initiated several major policy reversals that involve administrative politics. For example, in June 2002, he gave a national address promoting the creation of a Department of Homeland Security after having long opposed a cabinet-level...
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Back to the Future? toward Revitalizing the Study of the Administrative Presidency
When the term "administrative presidency" was first coined by Richard Nathan (1983), it was focused largely on presidents selecting political appointees who shared their policy aims and wished to alter organizational structures, personnel systems,...
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Introduction to the Symposium on "The Administrative Presidency"
The term "administrative presidency" was coined by Richard Nathan in his 1983 book of that title to describe the efforts of the Richard M. Nixon White House to gain control of the federal administrative apparatus. Nixon wanted the bureaucracy to be...
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Organizational Complexity and Coordination Dilemmas in U.S. Executive Politics
American presidents are capable of imposing their will on administrative agencies. Perhaps the most powerful illustration of this has been the centralization of major executive branch regulatory review procedures through Executive Order nos. 12291...
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Polls and Elections: How Did the Primary Vote Forecasts Fare in 2008?
This study compares the leading presidential primary vote forecasts for a common set of candidates and nomination campaigns through 2008. Primary vote forecast models are valuable diagnostic tools. They tell us something about what we know and do not...
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Revisiting the Administrative Presidency: Policy, Patronage, and Agency Competence
Recent episodes of presidential politicization of the executive branch present a quandary for administrative presidency scholars. (1) While existing work on the politics of appointments assumes that appointed positions are intended to enhance presidential...
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The Administrative Presidency and Bureaucratic Control: Implementing a Research Agenda
A quarter century ago, Richard Nathan (1983) called renewed attention to the phenomenon of the "administrative presidency." In describing the strategies of the inner circles of Richard M. Nixon and Ronald Reagan as they sought to enhance the responsiveness...
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The Administrative Presidency, Unilateral Power, and the Unitary Executive Theory
The essays in this symposium examine the administrative presidency strategy. That leadership strategy originally was initiated by the Richard M. Nixon administration as an attempt to accomplish administratively what it could not do legislatively (Nathan...
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The Appointments Process and the Administrative Presidency
As with most aspects of the Constitution, the power of presidents to hire, fire, and otherwise create an administration consistent with presidential tastes leaves much to the imagination. Much of the definition of appointive and dismissal power, and...
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The Contemporary Presidency: Constitutional Reform and the Presidency: The Recent Effort to Repeal the Natural-Born Citizen Requirement
Article II, Section 1, clause 5 of the U.S. Constitution states, "No person except a natural-born citizen, or a citizen of the United States, at the time of the adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible to the office of President." Recently,...
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The Law: The Baker-Christopher War Powers Commission
In an op-ed piece published in the New York Times on July 8, 2008, former secretaries of state James A. Baker III and Warren Christopher summarize the findings and recommendations of the National War Powers Commission. The article begins on this note:...
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