Presidential Studies Quarterly

Presidential Studies Quarterly is a quarterly newsletter on the subject of citizenship. Presidential Studies Quarterly is written by the Center for the Study of the Presidency and published by Sage Publications, Inc., in Thousand Oaks, Calif.

Articles from Vol. 39, No. 4, December

Alternative Futures: Comment on Terry Moe's "The Revolution in Presidential Studies"
Terry Moe is one of our most influential and well-respected scholars of the presidency. For a long time, he has been a vocal advocate for more a more rigorous and scientific approach to studying the presidency. To further those ends, he has pushed...
Building Reliable Theories of the Presidency
Giovanni Sartori's seminal analysis warns that the essential task of theory building is hampered by a false choice between two extreme views. At one extreme, grand theory seeks an all-encompassing explanation that can stretch across heterogeneous contexts;...
Checking Presidential Detention Power in the War on Terror: What Should We Expect from the Judiciary?
This article examines whether the U.S. Supreme Court serves as a significant check on presidential detention power in the war on terror. When the Supreme Court issued its first detainee decisions in 2004, (1) many in the popular media cheered the Court...
Does the Revolution in Presidential Studies Mean "Off with the President's Head"?
Terry Moe has written an engaging, often compelling, and assuredly provocative essay on what he calls the "revolution" in presidential studies (Moe 2009). It is a powerful piece that will surely find its way onto the reading lists of graduate seminars...
Mission Accomplished
Terry Moe's advisories preparing presidency scholars for the rational choice revolution were a staple at our annual conferences for many years. No one in attendance will forget those stunning presentations in which he heralded the power of the coming...
Polls and Elections: Preelection Poll Accuracy in the 2008 General Elections
Voters in the 2008 presidential election decidedly endorsed Democrat Barack Obama over his Republican opponent John McCain in the first-ever contest between two sitting U.S. senators. Amid growing economic turmoil and frustration with the war in Iraq...
Pontificating about Moe's Pontifications
I have been asked to comment on Terry Moe's review essay "The Revolution in Presidential Studies." At the onset, I must say that I am not fully comfortable in this role. Accustomed to writing research reports on evidence of scientific findings, I often...
The 2008-2009 Presidential Transition: Preparing Federal Agencies
By most accounts, the George W. Bush administration did more to help prepare its successor to govern than any previous administration, and for the first time in recent memory, the administration actively helped federal agencies prepare to ensure that...
The 2008-2009 Presidential Transition through the Voices of Its Participants
It was mid-morning at the White House on January 20, 2009. President and Mrs. George W. Bush were hosting the traditional pre-inauguration coffee in the Blue Room for President-Elect and Mrs. Barack Obama, as well as the Cheneys and the Bidens. Meanwhile,...
The Contemporary Presidency: The Political Utility of Empathy in Presidential Leadership
President Barack Obama made headlines during consideration of new U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor when he repeatedly stated that the personal quality of empathy would play a decisive role in the selection process. When Justice David Sourer...
The Eagleton Affair: Thomas Eagleton, George McGovern, and the 1972 Vice Presidential Nomination
The most defining moment in Tom Eagleton's public life involved his abbreviated Democratic nomination for the vice presidency in 1972--the only vice presidential nominee ever forced to resign from the ticket. The Eagleton affair still appears in the...
The Law: Bush, Cheney, and the Separation of Powers: A Lasting Legal Legacy?
It is no secret that long before his election as vice president, Dick Cheney was deeply committed to the proposition that the executive branch had been dangerously diminished in the aftermath of the Watergate scandals. The period after Watergate and...
The Revolution in Presidential Studies
Until very recently, the field of presidential studies had long suffered from an inferiority complex--a self-concept that arose not from weaknesses that were imagined, but from weaknesses that were real. The classic criticisms came from presidency...
The Rhetorical Presidency: Still Standing Tall
Jeffrey Tulis's book The Rhetorical Presidency has experienced a scholarly reception enjoyed by few other works in presidency studies. Ten years after its 1987 publication, it was the subject of at least two retrospective edited volumes (Ellis 1998;...
The Rhetorical Presidency Today: How Does It Stand Up?
The Rhetorical Presidency by Jeffrey Tulis has had a good run. Since its publication in 1987, the book has achieved landmark status in the field of presidential studies. It has also influenced scholarship in American political development, constitutional...
Thoughts on "The Revolution in Presidential Studies"
It has become conventional wisdom that the pre-1990s presidency literature was theoretically and empirically underdeveloped. I propose that we look at things from another perspective (although the literature does not look much better from this angle)....
We All Want a Revolution: Neustadt, New Institutionalism, and the Future of Presidency Research
Not so long ago, presidency scholarship was frequently maligned, not least by presidency scholars (Edwards 1981; Edwards, Kessel, and Rockman 1993; Heclo 1977b; King 1975; King 1993; Moe 1993; Peterson 1990; Wayne 1983). Critics bemoaned the subfield's...