Presidential Studies Quarterly

Presidential Studies Quarterly is a quarterly newsletter on the subject of citizenship. Presidential Studies Quarterly is written by the Center for the Study of the Presidency and published by Sage Publications, Inc., in Thousand Oaks, Calif.

Articles from Vol. 36, No. 1, March

Presidential Doctrines: An Introduction
"If you want war, nourish a doctrine," William Graham Sumner asserted in 1903. Sumner, one of America's leading public intellectuals, was writing in the aftermath of the Spanish-American War, a conflict brought on by expansionists citing the Monroe...
Securing the Middle East: The Eisenhower Doctrine of 1957
The Eisenhower Doctrine of 1957 consisted of a major commitment by the United States to the security and stability of the Middle East. A declaration that the United States would use economic aid, military aid, and armed forces to stop the spread of...
The Contemporary Presidency: The Sixth Year Curse
Near the end of 1958, Dwight Eisenhower relaxed for a weekend at the White House with his usual gang of friends. At breakfast, he remarked that 1958 had been a "terrible year" and described it as the "worst of his life" (Ambrose 1984, 486). If Eisenhower...
The Johnson Doctrine
As over 20,000 combat-ready U.S. troops landed in the Dominican Republic in late April and early May of 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson explained in a televised broadcast that "the American nations cannot, must not, and will not permit the establishment...
The Law: "Extraordinary Rendition" and Presidential Fiat
Renditions, the surrendering of persons to foreign jurisdictions, are commonplace in modern international affairs. When these transfers are made in accordance with treaty, and, if necessary, enabling statutes, and through a stipulated procedure, they...
The Monroe Doctrine: Meanings and Implications
The Monroe Doctrine as articulated before the U.S. Congress in 1823 established a rhetorical style associated many years later with similar pronouncements during the Cold War and after. Typically couched in the language of idealism and high principle,...
The Nixon Doctrine: A Saga of Misunderstanding
Conventional wisdom holds that President Richard M. Nixon came into office in January 1969 with a new set of foreign-policy principles that were later dubbed the "Nixon Doctrine." Many who have heard of the doctrine--including most specialists in the...
The Polls: Public Opinion and Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld
George W. Bush's secretary of defense, Donald Rumsfeld, has been characterized as a "central political figure in our time." (1) He is also one of the most controversial and contentious cabinet members of the Bush administration. Analysts argue Rumsfeld...
The Reagan Doctrine: Principle, Pragmatism, and Policy
The Reagan Doctrine emerged in an unusual manner, as it was discovered rather than proclaimed. When he delivered his State of the Union message on February 6, 1985, Ronald Reagan did not plan to announce a guiding principle of his administration's...
The Roosevelt Corollary
As Mark Gilderhus shows in an article in this issue, the nineteenth-century history of the Monroe Doctrine featured decades of dormancy broken by sporadic reassertions and elaborations of the policy crafted by John Quincy Adams and James Monroe in...
The Truman Doctrine: Containing Communism and Modernity
Addressing a joint session of Congress on March 12, 1947, President Harry S Truman requested $400 million in military and economic aid for Greece and Turkey. Convinced that both countries faced Communist aggression, the president enunciated a bold...