Presidential Studies Quarterly

Presidential Studies Quarterly is a quarterly newsletter on the subject of citizenship. Presidential Studies Quarterly is written by the Center for the Study of the Presidency and published by Sage Publications, Inc., in Thousand Oaks, Calif.

Articles from Vol. 38, No. 1, March

Constraining Executive Power: George W. Bush and the Constitution
The Framers of the Constitution were influenced by their English constitutional heritage with respect to individual rights and drew heavily upon British precedents. With respect to governmental structure, however, they rejected British precedent and...
Is It "President" or "President" of the United States?
Virtually every political observer who has used a pen or a keyboard in the past several decades has asked: is it "President" or "president" of the United States? Should the office or institution be referred to as the "Presidency" or "presidency"? At...
Opening the President's Mailbag: The Nixon Administration's Rhetorical Use of Public Opinion Mail
The connection between presidential policy rhetoric and public preferences is critical to democratic government, especially if policy rhetoric potentially slips into noncongruence or misrepresentation (Jacobs and Shapiro 2000). Scholars have adeptly...
President Jimmy Carter
On May 18, 2007, I interviewed President Jimmy Carter in his office in the Carter Center in Atlanta. The thirty-ninth president granted me an unusually long interview, excerpts from which are printed here. GE: Mr. President, first, let me thank...
Superpresidentialism and the Military: The Russian Variant
In any type of polity, the relationship between the executive and the armed forces is a quintessential institutional link. In most democracies the control of the military is the shared responsibility of the president, his or her government, and the...
Theories about Theory: Theory-Based Claims about Presidential Performance from the Case of James Madison
Of the forty-two individuals who have been president, at least one, James Madison, is widely recognized as a political theorist. (1) Another, Woodrow Wilson, received a PhD at a time when political philosophy was a standard part of the political science...
The Presidential Pork Barrel and the Conditioning Effect of Term
There have been numerous analyses of how presidential election rules and pressures shape campaign behavior. Shaw (1999) and Hill and McKee (2005) reveal, for example, that presidential candidates expend more resources in states with uncertain outcomes--these...
The Veterans' Bonus and the Evolving Presidency of Warren G. Harding
Between July 1921 and September 1922, the administration of Warren G. Harding was embroiled in a prolonged dispute with Congress on the issue of cash compensation for veterans of the First World War. The "soldiers" bonus debate was not a straightforward...
Treaty Negotiation: A Presidential Monopoly?
United States v. Curtiss-Wright (1936) involved a dispute over legislation passed by Congress two years earlier authorizing the president to impose an arms embargo in a region in South America. The issue was whether Congress had delegated too much...
Why "Go Public"? Presidential Use of Nominees to the U.S. Courts of Appeals
The process by which judges are appointed to the U.S. Courts of Appeals has changed dramatically in recent years. Confirmation obstruction and delay of these nominees have steadily increased since the mid 1990s (Goldman 2003). The increased involvement...