Presidential Studies Quarterly

Presidential Studies Quarterly is a quarterly newsletter on the subject of citizenship. Presidential Studies Quarterly is written by the Center for the Study of the Presidency and published by Sage Publications, Inc., in Thousand Oaks, Calif.

Articles from Vol. 32, No. 4, December

A Dose of Law and Realism for Presidential Studies
Three decades ago, Thomas Cronin (1974) urged us to understand the presidency as it is and not through the lens of what he called the "textbook presidency." Nonetheless, there is still too much glorification of presidential power in the classrooms...
Best Article Award for 2001. (Announcements)
A committee chaired by Professor Lyn Ragsdale of the University of Illinois at Chicago and including Professor Henry Graft of Columbia University and Professor Martin Medhurst of Texas A&M University selected an article by Professor William...
Knowing What Really Happened. (Articles)
Any historian of the presidency searches for evidence of motivation and causation. The historian of the modern presidency, therefore, is facing a problem that is growing more and more severe. Increasingly worried about such political dangers as...
Knowing What We Want to Know about the Presidency
The editor, George C. Edwards III, has asked an important question of presidential scholars: "What do we want to know about the presidency and why do we want to know it?" Acknowledging the centrality of the issue for our work, however, does not...
Presidency and American Political Development: A Third Look
The past century dawned with hope that the presidency might advance the cause of progressive democracy. As first articulated by Henry Jones Ford in The Rise and Growth of American Politics ([1898] 1967), the idea was that American political development...
Presidential Power and the Research Agenda
This responds to George C. Edwards III's question, "What do we want to know about the presidency and why do we want to know it?" Let me begin with a top-of-the-head summary of lingering concerns on my part regarding further research consequent...
Source Material: Nixon's Ghost Haunts the Presidential Records Act: The Reagan and George W. Bush Administrations
On November 1, 2001, President George W. Bush issued Executive Order 13233, which instituted new barriers to obtaining access to former presidents' White House materials. If left to stand, the executive order would effectively nullify the 1978 Presidential...
Studying the Polarized Presidency
Presidents are at the center of American politics. So to ask, "What do you want to know about the presidency?" is very close to asking, "What do you want to know about American politics?" For me, answering the latter question is easy, and my answer...
The Contemporary Presidency: The Permanence of the "Permanent Campaign": George W. Bush's Public Presidency. (Features)
One of the most conspicuous trends in the development of the modern American presidency is the emergence and growth of the plebiscitary presidency. Unlike their institutional forbearers who typically transmitted policy preferences directly to Congress...
The Kennedy Tapes
The Presidential Recordings: John F. Kennedy, the Great Crises. 3 vols. Edited by Ernest R. May, Timothy Naftali, and Philip D. Zelikow. New York: Norton, 2001. 1,882 pages, plus CD-ROM. Recordings of presidential meetings and telephone conversations...
The Law: The Impact of Antiterrorism Policies on Separation of Powers: Assessing John Ashcroft's Role
One predictable outcome of the tragic events of September 11, 2001, has been the expansion of presidential power. Political scientists have long noted how national crises serve to centralize power in the White House, and this moment in the nation's...
The Polls: Policy-Specific Presidential Approval, Part 2
In an earlier article for "The Polls" feature (Cohen 2002), I introduced a methodology to create monthly indices of foreign and economic policy presidential approval. I also described the trends in those series in that article. The advantage of...
Who Are These People?
Ever since the presidency of Richard M. Nixon, scholars have been in a quandary over how much they know about presidents. Nixon, we now have to say, was unstable in personality. The signs appeared well before discovery of the tapes, the latter an...
Why Do Presidents Fail?
What do we want to know about the presidency? As part of the future research agenda for presidency scholars, I would suggest two distinct but related issues: the first involves failed presidential decision making, particularly in the employment...
Why Do They Talk That Way? A Research Agenda for the Presidency
I begin with two quotations and two facts. The quotations are elliptical and the facts curious. Their meanings are curiouser still. That seems to be the state of the art for the American presidency at the dawn of the millennium. Theodore Roosevelt...