Presidential Studies Quarterly

Presidential Studies Quarterly is a quarterly newsletter on the subject of citizenship. Presidential Studies Quarterly is written by the Center for the Study of the Presidency and published by Sage Publications, Inc., in Thousand Oaks, Calif.

Articles from Vol. 32, No. 3, September

Assessing Changing Views of the President: Revisiting Greenstein's Children and Politics. (Articles)
How do children view the presidency? This question drew a good deal of attention in the 1960s, as best represented by the work of Fred Greenstein. Since that time, little effort has been made to see what today's children think about the presidency....
Executive-Judicial Interaction as a Factor in Explaining Presidential Policy Making
Despite the fact that presidents spend a considerable amount of time on foreign affairs, the president's ability to influence domestic policy continues to receive considerable scholarly attention and analysis. Studies have revealed that presidents...
From the Fabulous Baker Boys to the Master of Disaster: The White House Chief of Staff in the Reagan and G.H.W. Bush Administrations
Introduction: The Significance of the White House Chief of Staff The Clinton presidency began with great hope and expectation. Political observers marveled at the 1992 Clinton-Gore campaign machine as the war room concept of campaigning changed...
Harnessing Conflict in Foreign Policy Making: From Devil's to Multiple Advocacy
A large and alarming body of historical and laboratory evidence suggests that presidential decision making in foreign (and for that matter domestic) policy is plagued by a number of chronic impediments that may undermine the policy-making process...
Projecting Presidential Personas on the Radio: An Addendum on the Bushes. (Research Note)
In our recent exploration of the personality, stylistic, and substantive dimensions of Ronald Reagan's and Bill Clinton's Saturday rooming radio broadcasts (Sigelman and Whissell 2002), we ignored Reagan's immediate successor and Clinton's immediate...
"Reflections of Yesterday": George H. W. Bush's Instrumental Use of Public Opinion Research in Presidential Discourse
I believe that President Bush's attitude toward polls must have been about the same as it was toward speeches ... that it was not legitimate, that it was not real leadership, that it was somehow phony and artificial. --Bush press secretary Marlin...
Source Material: Presidential Data Locator
The Question of Approval This inaugural edition covers one troublesome data element: public approval. Does presidential public approval affect congressional support? The answer to this question constitutes a conundrum. To practitioners, the answer...
The Contemporary Presidency: The Bush White House: First Appraisals. (Features)
When the disputed election of 2000 ended with the Supreme Court's decision on December 12, it effectively shortened the presidential transition to less than fifty days and complicated the incoming administration's personnel problems. Chief among...
The Law: When Presidential Power Backfires: Clinton's Use of Clemency
The Constitution generally requires Congress and the president to reach a consensus through the regular legislative process. However, President Bill Clinton will be remembered not for what he did with Congress but what he did without it. On a broad...
The Polls: Policy-Specific Presidential Approval, Part 1
Perhaps more than any other issue, presidents are held responsible for foreign policy. The literature on public approval of the president, however, focuses more on the impact of economics on presidential approval than foreign affairs. Two factors...
The President, the Press, and the War-Making Power: An Analysis of Media Coverage Prior to the Persian Gulf War
Edward S. Corwin wrote at midcentury, "Taken by and large, the history of the presidency has been a history of aggrandizement" (1957, 307). At least with respect to war powers, recent years only have bolstered Corwin's observation. The Constitution...