Diabetes

diabetes or diabetes mellitus (məlī´təs), chronic disorder of glucose (sugar) metabolism caused by inadequate production or use of insulin, a hormone produced in specialized cells (beta cells in the islets of Langerhans) in the pancreas that allows the body to use and store glucose. It is a leading cause of death in the United States and is especially prevalent among African Americans. The treatment of diabetes was revolutionized when F. G. Banting and C. H. Best isolated insulin in 1921.

The Disorder

The lack of insulin results in an inability to metabolize glucose, and the capacity to store glycogen (a form of glucose) in the liver and the active transport of glucose across cell membranes are impaired. The symptoms are elevated sugar levels in the urine and blood, increased urination, thirst, hunger, weakness, weight loss, and itching. Prolonged hyperglycemia (excess blood glucose) leads to increased protein and fat catabolism, a condition that can cause premature vascular degeneration and atherosclerosis (see arteriosclerosis). Uncontrolled diabetes leads to diabetic acidosis, in which ketones build up in the blood. Patients have sweet-smelling breath, and may suffer confusion, unconsciousness, and death. There are two distinct types of diabetes mellitus: insulin-dependent and noninsulin-dependent.

Insulin-dependent Diabetes

Insulin-dependent diabetes (Type I), also called juvenile-onset diabetes, is the more serious form of the disease; about 10% of diabetics have this form. It is caused by destruction of pancreatic cells that make insulin and usually develops before age 30. Type I diabetics have a genetic predisposition to the disease. There is some evidence that it is triggered by a virus that changes the pancreatic cells in a way that prompts the immune system to attack them. The symptoms are the same as in the non-insulin-dependent variant, but they develop more rapidly and with more severity. Treatment includes a diet limited in carbohydrates and saturated fat, exercise to burn glucose, and regular insulin injections, sometimes administered via a portable insulin pump. Transplantation of islet cells has also proved somewhat successful since 1999, after new transplant procedures were developed, but the number of pancreases available for extraction of the islet cells is far smaller than the number of Type I diabetics. Patients receiving a transplant must take immunosuppressive drugs to prevent rejection of the cells, and many ultimately need to resume insulin injections, but despite that transplants provide real benefits for some whose diabetes has become difficult to control.

Noninsulin-dependent diabetes

Noninsulin-dependent diabetes (Type 2), also called adult-onset diabetes, results from the inability of the cells in the body to respond to insulin. About 90% of diabetics have this form, which is more prevalent in minorities and usually occurs after age 40. Although the cause is not completely understood, there is a genetic factor and 90% of those affected are obese. As in Type I diabetes, treatment includes exercise and weight loss and a diet low in total carbohydrates and saturated fat. Some individuals require insulin injections; many rely on oral drugs, such as sulphonylureas, metformin, acarbose or another alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, thiazolidinediones, or dipeptidyl peptidase–4 (DPP-4) inhibitors.

Complications

Diabetes affects the way the body handles fats, leading to fat accumulation in the arteries and potential damage to the kidneys, eyes, heart, and brain, and statins (cholesterol-lowering drugs) may be prescribed to prevent heart disease. It is the leading cause of kidney disease. Many patients require dialysis or kidney transplants (see transplantation, medical). Most cases of acquired blindness in the United States are caused by diabetes. Diabetes can also affect the nerves, causing numbness or pain in the face and extremities. A complication of insulin therapy is insulin shock, a hypoglycemic condition that results from an oversupply of insulin in relation to the glucose level in the blood (see hyperinsulinism).

Bibliography

See A. Bloom, Diabetes Explained (1973); Portland Area Diabetes Program, Diabetes and Insulin (1988); M. Davidson, Diabetes Mellitus: Diagnosis and Treatment (1991).

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright© 2014, The Columbia University Press.

Selected full-text books and articles on this topic

Understanding Diabetes
Marie Clark.
John Wiley & Sons, 2004
Diabetes: Caring for Your Emotions as Well as Your Health
Jerry Edelwich; Archie Brodsky.
Perseus Books, 1998 (Revised edition)
Diabetes, Beating the Odds: The Doctor's Guide to Reducing Your Risk
Elliot J. Rayfield; Cheryl Solimini; Mona Mark.
Perseus Books, 1992
Diabetic Adolescents and Their Families: Stress, Coping, and Adaptation
Inge Seiffge-Krenke.
Cambridge University Press, 2001
Type 2 Diabetes in Childhood and Adolescence: A Global Perspective
Martin Silink; Kaichi Kida; Arlan L Rosenbloom.
Martin Dunitz, 2003
Handbook of Pediatric Psychology in School Settings
Ronald T. Brown.
Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2004
Librarian’s tip: Chap. 11 "Diabetes and the School-Age Child and Adolescent: Facilitating Good Glycemic Control and Quality of Life"
The Psychology of Health: An Introduction
Marian Pitts; Keith Phillips.
Routledge, 1998 (2nd edition)
Librarian’s tip: Chap. 12 "Diabetes"
Physical Activity and Health: The Evidence Explained
Jeremy N. Cbe Morris; Adrianne E. Hardman; David J. Stensel.
Routledge, 2003
Librarian’s tip: Chap. 6 "Type 2 Diabetes"
Hypertension in Diabetes
Bryan Williams.
Martin Dunitz, 2003
The Management of Obesity and Related Disorders
Peter G. Kopelman.
Martin Dunitz, 2001
Librarian’s tip: Chap. 2 "Obesity and Diabetes"
CHALLENGES OF TYPE 2 DIABETES AND ROLE OF HEALTH CARE SOCIAL WORK: A Neglected Area of Practice
DeCoster, Vaughn A.
Health and Social Work, Vol. 26, No. 1, February 2001
Psychosocial Factors and Ethnic Disparities in Diabetes Diagnosis and Treatment among Older Adults
Bertera, Elizabeth M.
Health and Social Work, Vol. 28, No. 1, February 2003
The Thinking Person's Guide to Diabetes: The Draznin Plan
Boris Draznin.
Oxford University Press, 2003
Laughing Gas, Viagra, and Lipitor: The Human Stories behind the Drugs We Use
Jie Jack Li.
Oxford University Press, 2006
Librarian’s tip: Chap. 6 "Diabetes Drugs"
In Sickness and in Play: Children Coping with Chronic Illness
Cindy Dell Clark.
Rutgers University Press, 2003
Librarian’s tip: Chap. 2 "Juvenile Diabetes"
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