Rutgers and BYU to Showcase RLG's CitaDel Service

Article excerpt

CitaDel, the new citation and document-delivery service from the Research Libraries Group (RLG), is being pre-viewed this spring at Rutgers and Brigham Young universities.

Since April 6 and running through the 22 of this month, the two RLG-member institutions have been providing their campus communities with unlimited online access to five CitaDel files: ABI/inform, Periodical Abstracts, Newspaper Abstracts, Ei Page One, and Current Bibliography in the History of Technology.

"Our goal is to provide students and faculty with prompt access to current information, regardless of where the information comes from," said Joanne R. Euster, Rutgers vice president for university libraries. "We anticipate being able to substitute CitaDel access on the campus network for many of the stand-alone CD-ROM services we now subscribe to. The new result will be vastly greater convenience for our students and faculty with little if any increased cost."

RLG's CitaDel service provides libraries and campus information networks with online access to some of the most popular and interesting scholarly citation databases available today. Institutions need only a connection to RLIN (RLG's information network) to be able to subscribe to CitaDel. Institutions can connect to RLIN through a dedicated RLIN line, the Internet, or SprintNet direct-dial access. With RLIN available on a campuswide network, scholars and students can search CitaDel files from their own terminals. All loading, maintaining, and updating of CitaDel files are done centrally at RLG, which has designed the service for multiuser access and quick response. One easy-to-learn, easy-to-use search interface is used for searching all CitaDel files.

Connection to RLIN also gives CitaDel users access to the central RLIN database, an online catalog of more than 50 million items held by over 100 of the world's leading research institutions. It contains citations to resources such as books, serials, archives and manuscripts, maps, music scores, sound recordings, films, photographs, and computer files. Also in RLIN are special databases in the fields of art and architecture, eighteenth-century printed material, and current research in progress in the humanities. RLIN supports citation in Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Cyrillic, Hebrew, and Arabic characters and is the only online bibliographic utility to accomodate these six non-Roman scripts.

"Upgrading the visibility of journal articles has long been a goal of the BYU Library," connected Sterling J. Albrecht, university librarian of the BYU Library. "With over 65 percent of our materials budget committed to serials, we've been concerned with the tedious steps required to access this literature. CitaDel is a classic example of how electronic access to automated indexing and abstracting services equalizes the visibility of the article with that of the book."

Continued Albrecht: "With the same search protocol for all its files, CitaDel overcomes a chronic obstruction to electronic research--the necessity to learn a different search strategy for each file searched. BYU faculty and students will find CitaDel an exciting breakthrough in the library's efforts to facilitate both scholarly research and academic studies. …