Toronto Globe and Mail to Begin New Page Transmission System

Article excerpt

Five remote print sites to be involved

FRIDAY THE 13TH is the May start-up date for a new page transmission system from the Toronto Globe and Mail to its five remote print sites.

Unfazed by the unpropitious day and the scramble to work around a satellite failure last month, the Canadian national daily will employ new equipment that can transmit page facsimiles faster and exploit pagination through use of remote typesetting.

It also will move to new frequencies, allowing it to return to its original Anik E1 communications satellite and deliver a cleaner signal to its most distant print site.

Outbound compressed page data will move in shorter time by satellite from an Information International Inc. InfoFax II system. Inbound signals from remote sites will travel on landlines.

The new system will support, when needed, a change in transmission from page facsimile mode to PostScript language or other page data format, thereby eliminating the need to scan pages that are output in Toronto.

With the narrower bandwidth required by the compressed data, the paper "can transmit any time we want, as opposed to a broadband transmission in fixed time periods," editorial information systems manager Don Grey said.

When the triple-I InfoFax network replaces the Eocom system installed in 1980, production director Thomas Hogan said, Globe and Mail page transmissions to Nova Scotia, Quebec, Manitoba, Alberta and British Columbia will move up to Ku-band satellite frequencies.

They also will be able to move back to Telesat Canada's Anik E1 satellite.

The spacecraft, which failed for most of eight hours Jan. 20, absorbed priority traffic from its E2 neighbor when that sister satellite failed about an hour after service was restored on E1.

Most E1 clients were bumped in the process. …