Green Reads: Books on the Environment, the Economy, and Equity

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Whether you're a die-hard "greenie" or someone just trying to keep up with the issues, there's a blizzard of books out there that address the perils our planet is facing. In previous issues, we've highlighted The Green Collar Economy, by Van Jones, which examines how a "Green New Deal" can address economic inequality and environmental devastation, and Bill McKibben's Deep Economy, which urges us to create localized economies that are sustainable and community-oriented. Here are others to cheek out.

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Soil Not Oil: Environmental Justice in an Age of Climate Crisis, by Vandana Shiva. Environmental, economic, and agricultural degradation are deeply connected--industrial agricultural practices not only destroy the environment, but actually cause hunger and poverty. Shiva says we must return to local economies and small-scale food production, and provides examples of how we can use agricultural principles to build a sustainable, just society. (South End Press)

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Christians, the Care of Creation, and Global Climate Change, edited by Lindy Scott. Part one of this essay collection addresses aspects of climate change, including its impact on our health and the economy. The second half looks at the greening of Wheaton College and the steps and people involved in making it happen--former student Ben Lowe among them (Pickwick Publications). Lowe has written his own book on the topic, Green Revolution: Coming Together to Care for Creation, geared toward the Millennial Generation. Lowe works with campuses, churches, and communities to start local movements and support existing ones, so the book offers a timely look at what's happening on campuses around these issues. (InterVarsity Press)

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Holy Ground: A Gathering of Voices on Caring for Creation, edited by Lyndsay Moseley. A variety of faith leaders articulate the spiritual imperative of caring for the Earth Wendell Berry, Sally Bingham, Pope Benedict XVI, Terry Tempest Williams, Joel Hunter, and Abraham Joshua Heschel, among others. (Sierra Club Books)

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You Are Here: Exposing the Vital Link Between What We Do and What That Does to Our Planet, by Thomas Kostigen. Kostigen examines the most environmentally scary places on earth--Mumbai, for example, the final resting place for much of our computer hardware. …