Paradigm Shifting for Environmental Managers

Article excerpt

Trying environmental management to social justice and profits was a major theme of the Global Environmental Management Initiative (GEMI) 2000 Conference on March 27-28 in Baltimore.

C.T. Wright, Ph.D., the executive director of the International Foundation for Education and Self-Help, kicked off the annual meeting by urging attendees to adopt the Global Sullivan Principles. "These principles call for human rights, they are sensitive to gender and labor rights issues, and they have already been adopted by a number of companies," Wright said.

The eight principles were developed by the Rev. Leon Sullivan along with 10 members of the business community that included Procter & Gamble, General Motors and Colgate-Palmolive.

Wright asked the members of his audience to review the principles and indicate how they relate to the Global Sullivan Principles. The principles are available online at www.sullivanprinciples.org.

Reducing the wasteful and destructive flow of resources represents a major business opportunity, author Amory Lovins said in another major address at the conference.

Lovins made the case for a new business model he termed "natural capitalism," calling it what capitalism would be like if it behaved as if its two largest sources of capital - nature and people - were properly valued. …