In the News

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Study Finds Errors in Science Textbooks

"Twelve of the most popular science textbooks used at middle schools nationwide are riddled with errors, a new study has found.

"Researchers compiled 500 pages of errors, from maps depicting the equator passing through the southern United States to a photo of singer Linda Ronstadt labeled as a silicon Crystal."--The Plain Dealer, January 16, 2001.

To read the full article, visit http://www.develand.com/news/ index.ssf?/news/pd/w16error.htm.

One Mold Charters Can't Break

"The United Charter School is designed to serve 1,200 children in a low-income neighborhood in Baton Rouge, La. It is widely supported by area residents, who are almost entirely African-American. It's in compliance with the Louisiana state charter law.

"Yet the schools' doors remain shut. The reason: United Charter runs afoul of a federal desegregation order requiring a racial balance in the parish's public schools. The US Department of Justice argues that the school will not attract enough white students."--The Christian Science Monitor, January 9, 2001.

To read the full article, visit http://www.csmonitor.com/dura ble/2001/01/09/fp11s1csm.shtml.

Student Activists Raise Voices to Upgrade Schools

"When Erica Highsmith talks about her school, adults listen. She doesn't give them a choice. That's one of the lessons she's learned as a three-year member of Youth United for Change, a local group that teaches leadership and advocacy skills to middle and high school students here.

"Ms. Highsmith, who once felt like a lone voice in a school with myriad problems, has since led drives to reel in district technology money and to build a much-needed college-resource center at Olney High School in North Philadelphia, where she's a senior."--Education Week, January 17, 2001.

To read the full article, visit http://www.edweek.org/ew/ ewstory.cfm?slug=18philly.h20.

Study Says Effects of TV Violence on Children Reversible

"Grade-school children with limited exposure to television and video games are less likely to act up, a study out today suggests, while offering hope for longtime couch tater tots. …